The pharmacogenomic HLA biomarker associated to adverse abacavir reactions

Comparative analysis of different genotyping methods

Laura Stocchi, Raffaella Cascella, Stefania Zampatti, Antonella Pirazzoli, Giuseppe Novelli, Emiliano Giardina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many pharmacogenomic biomarkers (PGBM) were identified and translated into clinical practice, affecting the usage of drugs via label updates. In this context, abacavir is one of the most brilliant examples of pharmacogenetic studies translated into clinical practice. Pharmacogenetic studies have revealed that abacavir HSRs are highly associated with the major histocompatibility complex class I. Large studies established the effectiveness of prospective HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent HSRs to abacavir. Accordingly to these results the abacavir label has been modified: the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the FDA recommend/suggested that the administration of abacavir must be preceded by a specific genotyping test. The HLA locus is extremely polymorphic, exhibiting many closely related alleles, making it difficult to discriminate HLA-B*57:01 from other related alleles, and a number of different molecular techniques have been developed recently to detect the presence of HLA-B*57:01. In this review, we provide a summary of the available techniques used by laboratories to genotype HLA-B*57:01, outlining the scientific and pharmacoeconomics pros and cons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-320
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Genomics
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Pharmacogenetics
Biomarkers
Alleles
Pharmaceutical Economics
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Genotype
abacavir
HLA-B57 antigen
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacogenomic Testing

Keywords

  • Abacavir
  • HLA-B*57:01
  • Hypersensitivity reaction (HSR)
  • Pharmacogenomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

The pharmacogenomic HLA biomarker associated to adverse abacavir reactions : Comparative analysis of different genotyping methods. / Stocchi, Laura; Cascella, Raffaella; Zampatti, Stefania; Pirazzoli, Antonella; Novelli, Giuseppe; Giardina, Emiliano.

In: Current Genomics, Vol. 13, No. 4, 06.2012, p. 314-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stocchi, Laura ; Cascella, Raffaella ; Zampatti, Stefania ; Pirazzoli, Antonella ; Novelli, Giuseppe ; Giardina, Emiliano. / The pharmacogenomic HLA biomarker associated to adverse abacavir reactions : Comparative analysis of different genotyping methods. In: Current Genomics. 2012 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 314-320.
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