The photodynamic effect of tetra-substituted N-methyl-pyridyl-porphine combined with the action of vancomycin or host defense mechanisms disrupts Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

Maria S. Sbarra, Carla R. Arciola, Antonella Di Poto, Enrica Saino, Holger Rohde, Pietro Speziale, Livia Visai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The skin commensal and opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis is an important cause of nosocomial infections. Virulence is attributable to formation of biofilm, which provides a microenvironment that protects the bacterium from attack by the host immune system and by chemotherapy. In this study we extended to S. epidermidis strategies previously aimed at treatment of S. aureus biofilms using photodynamic treatment (PDT) combined with chemotherapy or phagocytosis. A significant reduction in bacterial survival was observed when structurally distinct biofilms were exposed to the cationic porphyrin, tetra-substituted N-methyl-pyridyl-porphine (TMP), and simultaneously to visible light. Of note, the extent of biofilm clearance depended on its maturation stage: developing, young biofilms, were more sensitive towards PDT than mature biofilms. Furthermore, PDT-treated biofilms exposed to vancomycin or subjected to phagocytic action of whole blood were almost completely eradicated. The data we obtained establish that PDT combined with antibiotics or host defenses may also be a useful approach for the inactivation of S. epidermidis biofilms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)574-583
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Artificial Organs
Volume32
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT)
  • S. epidermidis biofilms
  • Tetra-substituted N-methyl-pyridyl-porphine (TMP)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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