The prevalence of dysphonia and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated diseases and the role of psychometric tests

J. Galli, M. R. Marchese, C. de Canio, M. Di Salvo, I. Olivieri, L. Santandrea, G. Paludetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This cross-sectional investigation examined the prevalence and severity of dysphonia, globus pharyngeus, and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated (IM) diseases. Seventy subjects were administered the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) (scale 0–4), Glasgow-Edinburgh Throat Scale (GETS) (scale from 0 to 7) for globus pharyngeus assessment, and modified Swallowing Outcomes After Revised Laryngectomy (SOAL) (scale 0, 1, 2) to test swallowing symptoms. VHI: the mean percentage of answers with a score greater than 1 (corresponding to a frequency of situation’s occurrence “sometimes,” “almost always,” or “always”) was 25.7, 26.7, and 44.1% for functional, emotional, and physical groups of sub-items respectively. GETS: the mean percentage of answers with a score ≥ 3 was 60.85%, significantly higher if compared with that of answers with a score < 3 (40.14%). The mean percentages of answers with a score 0–2, 3–4, and 5–7 were 40.1, 16.7, and 43.7% respectively. SOAL: a mean of 57.9% of answers gained a symptomatic score (1 [“a little”] or 2 [“a lot”]) and 41.9%, the score 0. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The first two most recurrent items with a score 2 (“a lot”) were “Do you have a problem swallowing dry food?” (46%) and “Do you have a problem swallowing solid food?” (36%). The study represents the first to describe the globus pharyngeus symptoms in IM population. Moreover, it allows to confirm the recurrence of dysphonia and dysphagia in this type of patients. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that the alteration of swallowing function is related to solid and dry food. The self-assessment questionnaires proved as a useful tool to early detection of dysfunctions in order to avoid further deterioration of quality of life and to prevent serious life-threatening complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Rheumatology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - May 5 2018

Fingerprint

Dysphonia
Deglutition
Deglutition Disorders
Psychometrics
Laryngectomy
Pharynx
Food
Quality of Life
Recurrence
Population

Keywords

  • Dysphagia
  • Dysphonia
  • Globus pharyngeus
  • Immunomediated diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

The prevalence of dysphonia and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated diseases and the role of psychometric tests. / Galli, J.; Marchese, M. R.; de Canio, C.; Di Salvo, M.; Olivieri, I.; Santandrea, L.; Paludetti, G.

In: Clinical Rheumatology, 05.05.2018, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galli, J. ; Marchese, M. R. ; de Canio, C. ; Di Salvo, M. ; Olivieri, I. ; Santandrea, L. ; Paludetti, G. / The prevalence of dysphonia and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated diseases and the role of psychometric tests. In: Clinical Rheumatology. 2018 ; pp. 1-8.
@article{bed260e640424846b0c944c8dd696002,
title = "The prevalence of dysphonia and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated diseases and the role of psychometric tests",
abstract = "This cross-sectional investigation examined the prevalence and severity of dysphonia, globus pharyngeus, and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated (IM) diseases. Seventy subjects were administered the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) (scale 0–4), Glasgow-Edinburgh Throat Scale (GETS) (scale from 0 to 7) for globus pharyngeus assessment, and modified Swallowing Outcomes After Revised Laryngectomy (SOAL) (scale 0, 1, 2) to test swallowing symptoms. VHI: the mean percentage of answers with a score greater than 1 (corresponding to a frequency of situation’s occurrence “sometimes,” “almost always,” or “always”) was 25.7, 26.7, and 44.1{\%} for functional, emotional, and physical groups of sub-items respectively. GETS: the mean percentage of answers with a score ≥ 3 was 60.85{\%}, significantly higher if compared with that of answers with a score < 3 (40.14{\%}). The mean percentages of answers with a score 0–2, 3–4, and 5–7 were 40.1, 16.7, and 43.7{\%} respectively. SOAL: a mean of 57.9{\%} of answers gained a symptomatic score (1 [“a little”] or 2 [“a lot”]) and 41.9{\%}, the score 0. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The first two most recurrent items with a score 2 (“a lot”) were “Do you have a problem swallowing dry food?” (46{\%}) and “Do you have a problem swallowing solid food?” (36{\%}). The study represents the first to describe the globus pharyngeus symptoms in IM population. Moreover, it allows to confirm the recurrence of dysphonia and dysphagia in this type of patients. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that the alteration of swallowing function is related to solid and dry food. The self-assessment questionnaires proved as a useful tool to early detection of dysfunctions in order to avoid further deterioration of quality of life and to prevent serious life-threatening complications.",
keywords = "Dysphagia, Dysphonia, Globus pharyngeus, Immunomediated diseases",
author = "J. Galli and Marchese, {M. R.} and {de Canio}, C. and {Di Salvo}, M. and I. Olivieri and L. Santandrea and G. Paludetti",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1007/s10067-018-4129-8",
language = "English",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Clinical Rheumatology",
issn = "0770-3198",
publisher = "Springer London",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The prevalence of dysphonia and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated diseases and the role of psychometric tests

AU - Galli, J.

AU - Marchese, M. R.

AU - de Canio, C.

AU - Di Salvo, M.

AU - Olivieri, I.

AU - Santandrea, L.

AU - Paludetti, G.

PY - 2018/5/5

Y1 - 2018/5/5

N2 - This cross-sectional investigation examined the prevalence and severity of dysphonia, globus pharyngeus, and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated (IM) diseases. Seventy subjects were administered the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) (scale 0–4), Glasgow-Edinburgh Throat Scale (GETS) (scale from 0 to 7) for globus pharyngeus assessment, and modified Swallowing Outcomes After Revised Laryngectomy (SOAL) (scale 0, 1, 2) to test swallowing symptoms. VHI: the mean percentage of answers with a score greater than 1 (corresponding to a frequency of situation’s occurrence “sometimes,” “almost always,” or “always”) was 25.7, 26.7, and 44.1% for functional, emotional, and physical groups of sub-items respectively. GETS: the mean percentage of answers with a score ≥ 3 was 60.85%, significantly higher if compared with that of answers with a score < 3 (40.14%). The mean percentages of answers with a score 0–2, 3–4, and 5–7 were 40.1, 16.7, and 43.7% respectively. SOAL: a mean of 57.9% of answers gained a symptomatic score (1 [“a little”] or 2 [“a lot”]) and 41.9%, the score 0. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The first two most recurrent items with a score 2 (“a lot”) were “Do you have a problem swallowing dry food?” (46%) and “Do you have a problem swallowing solid food?” (36%). The study represents the first to describe the globus pharyngeus symptoms in IM population. Moreover, it allows to confirm the recurrence of dysphonia and dysphagia in this type of patients. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that the alteration of swallowing function is related to solid and dry food. The self-assessment questionnaires proved as a useful tool to early detection of dysfunctions in order to avoid further deterioration of quality of life and to prevent serious life-threatening complications.

AB - This cross-sectional investigation examined the prevalence and severity of dysphonia, globus pharyngeus, and dysphagia in patients affected by immunomediated (IM) diseases. Seventy subjects were administered the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) (scale 0–4), Glasgow-Edinburgh Throat Scale (GETS) (scale from 0 to 7) for globus pharyngeus assessment, and modified Swallowing Outcomes After Revised Laryngectomy (SOAL) (scale 0, 1, 2) to test swallowing symptoms. VHI: the mean percentage of answers with a score greater than 1 (corresponding to a frequency of situation’s occurrence “sometimes,” “almost always,” or “always”) was 25.7, 26.7, and 44.1% for functional, emotional, and physical groups of sub-items respectively. GETS: the mean percentage of answers with a score ≥ 3 was 60.85%, significantly higher if compared with that of answers with a score < 3 (40.14%). The mean percentages of answers with a score 0–2, 3–4, and 5–7 were 40.1, 16.7, and 43.7% respectively. SOAL: a mean of 57.9% of answers gained a symptomatic score (1 [“a little”] or 2 [“a lot”]) and 41.9%, the score 0. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The first two most recurrent items with a score 2 (“a lot”) were “Do you have a problem swallowing dry food?” (46%) and “Do you have a problem swallowing solid food?” (36%). The study represents the first to describe the globus pharyngeus symptoms in IM population. Moreover, it allows to confirm the recurrence of dysphonia and dysphagia in this type of patients. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that the alteration of swallowing function is related to solid and dry food. The self-assessment questionnaires proved as a useful tool to early detection of dysfunctions in order to avoid further deterioration of quality of life and to prevent serious life-threatening complications.

KW - Dysphagia

KW - Dysphonia

KW - Globus pharyngeus

KW - Immunomediated diseases

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046424264&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85046424264&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10067-018-4129-8

DO - 10.1007/s10067-018-4129-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 29728930

AN - SCOPUS:85046424264

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Clinical Rheumatology

JF - Clinical Rheumatology

SN - 0770-3198

ER -