The pros and cons of intraoperative CT scan in evaluation of deep brain stimulation lead implantation: A retrospective study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and tremor. The efficacy of DBS depends on the correct lead positioning. The commonly adopted postoperative radiological evaluation is performed with computed tomography (CT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 202 patients who underwent DBS from January 2009 to October 2013. DBS indications were PD, progressive supranuclear palsy, tremor, dystonia, Tourette syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and Huntington's disease. Preoperatively, all patients underwent brain MRI and brain CT scan with the stereotactic frame positioned. The lead location was confirmed intraoperatively with CT. The CT images were subsequently transferred to the Stealth Station Medtronic and merged with the preoperative planning. On the first or second day after, implantation we performed a brain MRI to confirm the correct position of the lead. Results: In 14 patients, leads were in suboptimal position after intraoperative CT scan positioning. The cases with alteration in the Z-axis were corrected immediately under fluoroscopic guidance. In all the 14 patients, an immediate repositioning was done. Conclusions: Based on our data, intraoperative CT scan is fast, safe, and a useful tool in the evaluation of the position of the implanted lead. It also reduces the patient's discomfort derived from the transfer of the patient from the operating room to the radiological department. However, intraoperative CT should not be considered as a substitute for postoperative MRI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S551-S556
JournalSurgical Neurology International
Volume7
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2016

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Deep Brain Stimulation
Retrospective Studies
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Dystonia
Tremor
Parkinson Disease
Brain
Moving and Lifting Patients
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Tourette Syndrome
Patients' Rooms
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Huntington Disease
Movement Disorders
Operating Rooms
Lead
Depression

Keywords

  • Accuracy
  • computed tomography
  • deep brain stimulation
  • imaging
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • O-Arm
  • targets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "The pros and cons of intraoperative CT scan in evaluation of deep brain stimulation lead implantation: A retrospective study",
abstract = "Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and tremor. The efficacy of DBS depends on the correct lead positioning. The commonly adopted postoperative radiological evaluation is performed with computed tomography (CT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 202 patients who underwent DBS from January 2009 to October 2013. DBS indications were PD, progressive supranuclear palsy, tremor, dystonia, Tourette syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and Huntington's disease. Preoperatively, all patients underwent brain MRI and brain CT scan with the stereotactic frame positioned. The lead location was confirmed intraoperatively with CT. The CT images were subsequently transferred to the Stealth Station Medtronic and merged with the preoperative planning. On the first or second day after, implantation we performed a brain MRI to confirm the correct position of the lead. Results: In 14 patients, leads were in suboptimal position after intraoperative CT scan positioning. The cases with alteration in the Z-axis were corrected immediately under fluoroscopic guidance. In all the 14 patients, an immediate repositioning was done. Conclusions: Based on our data, intraoperative CT scan is fast, safe, and a useful tool in the evaluation of the position of the implanted lead. It also reduces the patient's discomfort derived from the transfer of the patient from the operating room to the radiological department. However, intraoperative CT should not be considered as a substitute for postoperative MRI.",
keywords = "Accuracy, computed tomography, deep brain stimulation, imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, O-Arm, targets",
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T1 - The pros and cons of intraoperative CT scan in evaluation of deep brain stimulation lead implantation

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AU - Servello, Domenico

AU - Zekaj, Edvin

AU - Saleh, C.

AU - Pacchetti, Claudio

AU - Porta, Mauro

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N2 - Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and tremor. The efficacy of DBS depends on the correct lead positioning. The commonly adopted postoperative radiological evaluation is performed with computed tomography (CT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 202 patients who underwent DBS from January 2009 to October 2013. DBS indications were PD, progressive supranuclear palsy, tremor, dystonia, Tourette syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and Huntington's disease. Preoperatively, all patients underwent brain MRI and brain CT scan with the stereotactic frame positioned. The lead location was confirmed intraoperatively with CT. The CT images were subsequently transferred to the Stealth Station Medtronic and merged with the preoperative planning. On the first or second day after, implantation we performed a brain MRI to confirm the correct position of the lead. Results: In 14 patients, leads were in suboptimal position after intraoperative CT scan positioning. The cases with alteration in the Z-axis were corrected immediately under fluoroscopic guidance. In all the 14 patients, an immediate repositioning was done. Conclusions: Based on our data, intraoperative CT scan is fast, safe, and a useful tool in the evaluation of the position of the implanted lead. It also reduces the patient's discomfort derived from the transfer of the patient from the operating room to the radiological department. However, intraoperative CT should not be considered as a substitute for postoperative MRI.

AB - Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and tremor. The efficacy of DBS depends on the correct lead positioning. The commonly adopted postoperative radiological evaluation is performed with computed tomography (CT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 202 patients who underwent DBS from January 2009 to October 2013. DBS indications were PD, progressive supranuclear palsy, tremor, dystonia, Tourette syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and Huntington's disease. Preoperatively, all patients underwent brain MRI and brain CT scan with the stereotactic frame positioned. The lead location was confirmed intraoperatively with CT. The CT images were subsequently transferred to the Stealth Station Medtronic and merged with the preoperative planning. On the first or second day after, implantation we performed a brain MRI to confirm the correct position of the lead. Results: In 14 patients, leads were in suboptimal position after intraoperative CT scan positioning. The cases with alteration in the Z-axis were corrected immediately under fluoroscopic guidance. In all the 14 patients, an immediate repositioning was done. Conclusions: Based on our data, intraoperative CT scan is fast, safe, and a useful tool in the evaluation of the position of the implanted lead. It also reduces the patient's discomfort derived from the transfer of the patient from the operating room to the radiological department. However, intraoperative CT should not be considered as a substitute for postoperative MRI.

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