The qualitative nature of the primary immune response to HIV infection is a prognosticator of disease progression independent of the initial level of plasma viremia

Giuseppe Pantaleo, James F. Demarest, Timothy Schacker, Mauro Vaccarezza, Oren J. Cohen, Marybeth Daucher, Cecilia Graziosi, Steven S. Schnittman, Thomas C. Quinn, George M. Shaw, Luc Perrin, Giuseppe Tambussi, Adriano Lazzarin, Rafick P. Sekaly, Hugo Soudeyns, Lawrence Corey, Anthony S. Fauci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Following infection of the host with a virus, the delicate balance between virus replication/spread and the immune response to the virus determines the outcome of infection, i.e., persistence versus elimination of the virus. It is unclear, however, what relative roles immunologic and virologic factors play during primary viral infection in determining the subsequent clinical outcome. By studying a cohort of subjects with primary HIV infection, it has been demonstrated that qualitative differences in the primary immune response to HIV, but not quantitative differences in the initial levels of viremia are associated with different clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)254-258
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 7 1997

Keywords

  • primary infection
  • prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

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