The relation of post-work ruminative thinking with eating behaviour

Mark Cropley, Georgia Michalianou, Gabriella Pravettoni, Lynne J. Millward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inability to unwind about work during leisure time has been associated with a number of negative health outcomes. This study was concerned with a possible behavioural pathway between unwinding and disease and examined the relationship between work-related rumination and food choice. Work-related rumination is arguably a core to understanding the 'unwinding process', and food choice is a well-established indicator of nutritional health. Two hundred and sixty-eight full-time workers from a range of white-collar occupations completed a self-report measure of ruminative thinking about work and an eating behaviour questionnaire. Three types of ruminative thinking were identified by factor analysis and labelled affective rumination, problem-solving pondering and detachment. In terms of food choice, high-relative to low-affective ruminators reported eating more unhealthy foods, and low detachers reported eating less cooked meals and more processed foods compared to high detachers. Problem-solving pondering was not associated with food choice, and none of the factors were associated with healthy food choice. It was concluded that failure to unwind from work is not necessarily related to unhealthy food choices. What appears to be the crucial factor is the type of perseverative thinking that people engage in post-work. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-30
Number of pages8
JournalStress and Health
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Feeding Behavior
Food
Eating
Thinking
Leisure Activities
Health
Occupations
Self Report
Statistical Factor Analysis
Meals

Keywords

  • food choice
  • rumination
  • unwinding
  • work

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The relation of post-work ruminative thinking with eating behaviour. / Cropley, Mark; Michalianou, Georgia; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Millward, Lynne J.

In: Stress and Health, Vol. 28, No. 1, 02.2012, p. 23-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cropley, Mark ; Michalianou, Georgia ; Pravettoni, Gabriella ; Millward, Lynne J. / The relation of post-work ruminative thinking with eating behaviour. In: Stress and Health. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 23-30.
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