The relationship of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate to inflammatory cytokines and survival in patients with chronic heart failure treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors

Rakesh Sharma, Mathias Rauchhaus, Piotr P. Ponikowski, Susan Varney, Philip A. Poole-Wilson, Douglas L. Mann, Andrew J S Coats, Stefan D. Anker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives. The object of the study was to assess the relationship between erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and inflammatory cytokine production in chronic heart failure (CHF). Our findings lead us to re-evaluate the prognostic value of the ESR in assessing patients with CHF. Background. The search for simple prognostic markers in CHF that can be assessed anywhere at low cost is important. Increases in ESR are related to the acute phase response in states of inflammation and infection. Methods. Initially, we studied ESR in relation to plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines in 58 CHF patients. The findings prompted us to analyze the mortality predictive power of ESR compared with established risk factors in these patients and (retrospectively) in a second group of 101 clinically stable CHF patients who had ESR measured. Results. In all 159 CHF patients (age 62 ± 2 years, New York Heart Association [NYHA] class 2.7 ± 0.1), ESR ranged from 1 to 96 mm/h (median 14 mm/h). The ESR was correlated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (r = 0.31, p <0.05), soluble TNF receptor-1 (r = 0.48, p <0.0005), soluble TNF receptor-2 (r = 0.39, p <0.005) and interleukin 6 (r = 0.45, p <0.005) levels. High ESR levels indicated a poor prognosis (p <0.0001), and this was independent of age, NYHA class, ejection fraction and peak oxygen consumption (p <0.005). Patients with ESR above median (≥15 mm/h) compared with patients with ESR

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-528
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Blood Sedimentation
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Heart Failure
Cytokines
Survival
Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II
Acute-Phase Reaction
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors
Oxygen Consumption
Interleukin-6
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Inflammation
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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The relationship of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate to inflammatory cytokines and survival in patients with chronic heart failure treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. / Sharma, Rakesh; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Ponikowski, Piotr P.; Varney, Susan; Poole-Wilson, Philip A.; Mann, Douglas L.; Coats, Andrew J S; Anker, Stefan D.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 36, No. 2, 2000, p. 523-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, Rakesh ; Rauchhaus, Mathias ; Ponikowski, Piotr P. ; Varney, Susan ; Poole-Wilson, Philip A. ; Mann, Douglas L. ; Coats, Andrew J S ; Anker, Stefan D. / The relationship of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate to inflammatory cytokines and survival in patients with chronic heart failure treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2000 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 523-528.
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AU - Varney, Susan

AU - Poole-Wilson, Philip A.

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AU - Coats, Andrew J S

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