The role of 123I-ioflupane SPECT dopamine transporter imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with dementia with Lewy bodies

Angelo Antonini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is difficult if one relies solely on clinical features. Current International Consensus Criteria for DLB have high specificity but a significant percentage of patients might be misdiagnosed. Reasons for clinical uncertainty regard the presence of concomitant motor signs in patients with Alzheimer's disease as well as the observation that cognitive abnormalities in DLB might develop with memory impairment without significant parkinsonism. This has clinical relevance as DLB patients may be particularly sensitive to anti-psychotics and even the effectiveness of atypical neuroleptics such as quetiapine for the treatment of agitation and hallucinations has been questioned by double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized studies. By contrast, acetyl-cholinesterase inhibitors such as rivastigmine have shown benefit not only on cognitive but also on psychiatric symptoms. Receni evidence shows that striatal doparnine transporter binding of 123I-ioflupane SPECT is reduced in DLB and this is consistent with a significant loss of nigral dopamine neurons in this disorder. Several studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy of 123I-ioflupane in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism. Given the availability of SPECT, this investigation represents a useful marker to support clinical diagnosis and can help establishing appropriate treatment for this disorder.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-292
Number of pages6
JournalNeuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
Volume3
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • I-ioflupane-SPECT
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Dementia with Lewy bodies
  • Dopamine transporter
  • Parkinsonism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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