The role of cognitive reserve in cognitive aging: what we can learn from Parkinson’s disease

Nicoletta Ciccarelli, Maria Rita Lo Monaco, Domenico Fusco, Davide Liborio Vetrano, Giuseppe Zuccalà, Roberto Bernabei, Vincenzo Brandi, Maria Stella Pisciotta, Maria Caterina Silveri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) typically occurs in elderly people and some degree of cognitive impairment is usually present. Cognitive reserve (CR) theory was proposed to explain the discrepancy between the degree of brain pathologies and clinical manifestations. We administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery to 35 non-demented participants affected by PD. All participants underwent also the Cognitive Reserve Index questionnaire and the Brief Intelligence Test as proxies for CR. Relationships between CR and cognitive performance were investigated by linear regression analyses, adjusting for significant confounding factors. At linear regression analyses, higher CR scores were independently associated with a better performance on Word Fluency (p ≤ 0.04) and Digit Span (backward) (p ≤ 0.02); no associations were observed between CR and other cognitive tests. Our data provide empirical support to the relation between CR and cognitive impairment in PD. In particular, this study suggests that CR may have greater effects on the cognitive areas mostly affected in PD as executive functions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)877-880
Number of pages4
JournalAging clinical and experimental research
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2018

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Cognitive Reserve
Parkinson Disease
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Intelligence Tests
Clinical Pathology
Cognitive Aging
Executive Function
Proxy

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cognitive reserve
  • Executive functions
  • Neuropsychological examination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

The role of cognitive reserve in cognitive aging : what we can learn from Parkinson’s disease. / Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Monaco, Maria Rita Lo; Fusco, Domenico; Vetrano, Davide Liborio; Zuccalà, Giuseppe; Bernabei, Roberto; Brandi, Vincenzo; Pisciotta, Maria Stella; Silveri, Maria Caterina.

In: Aging clinical and experimental research, Vol. 30, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. 877-880.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ciccarelli, N, Monaco, MRL, Fusco, D, Vetrano, DL, Zuccalà, G, Bernabei, R, Brandi, V, Pisciotta, MS & Silveri, MC 2018, 'The role of cognitive reserve in cognitive aging: what we can learn from Parkinson’s disease', Aging clinical and experimental research, vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 877-880. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40520-017-0838-0
Ciccarelli, Nicoletta ; Monaco, Maria Rita Lo ; Fusco, Domenico ; Vetrano, Davide Liborio ; Zuccalà, Giuseppe ; Bernabei, Roberto ; Brandi, Vincenzo ; Pisciotta, Maria Stella ; Silveri, Maria Caterina. / The role of cognitive reserve in cognitive aging : what we can learn from Parkinson’s disease. In: Aging clinical and experimental research. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 7. pp. 877-880.
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