The role of cortical areas hMT/V5+ and TPJ on the magnitude of representational momentum and representational gravity: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study

Nuno Alexandre De Sá Teixeira, Gianfranco Bosco, Sergio Delle Monache, Francesco Lacquaniti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The perceived vanishing location of a moving target is systematically displaced forward, in the direction of motion—representational momentum—, and downward, in the direction of gravity—representational gravity. Despite a wealth of research on the factors that modulate these phenomena, little is known regarding their neurophysiological substrates. The present experiment aims to explore which role is played by cortical areas hMT/V5+, linked to the processing of visual motion, and TPJ, thought to support the functioning of an internal model of gravity, in modulating both effects. Participants were required to perform a standard spatial localization task while the activity of the right hMT/V5+ or TPJ sites was selectively disrupted with an offline continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) protocol, interspersed with control blocks with no stimulation. Eye movements were recorded during all spatial localizations. Results revealed an increase in representational gravity contingent on the disruption of the activity of hMT/V5+ and, conversely, some evidence suggested a bigger representational momentum when TPJ was stimulated. Furthermore, stimulation of hMT/V5+ led to a decreased ocular overshoot and to a time-dependent downward drift of gaze location. These outcomes suggest that a reciprocal balance between perceived kinematics and anticipated dynamics might modulate these spatial localization responses, compatible with a push–pull mechanism.

Original languageEnglish
JournalExperimental Brain Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Gravitation
Eye Movements
Biomechanical Phenomena
Research
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Medio-temporal area
  • Representational gravity
  • Representational momentum
  • Temporo-parietal junction
  • Theta-burst stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The role of cortical areas hMT/V5+ and TPJ on the magnitude of representational momentum and representational gravity : a transcranial magnetic stimulation study. / De Sá Teixeira, Nuno Alexandre; Bosco, Gianfranco; Delle Monache, Sergio; Lacquaniti, Francesco.

In: Experimental Brain Research, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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