The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders: Pushing the boundaries forward

Stéphane Lehericy, David E. Vaillancourt, Klaus Seppi, Oury Monchi, Irena Rektorova, Angelo Antonini, Martin J. McKeown, Mario Masellis, Daniela Berg, James B. Rowe, Simon J.G. Lewis, Caroline H. Williams-Gray, Alessandro Tessitore, Hartwig R. Siebner, on behalf of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS)-Neuroimaging Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Historically, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has contributed little to the study of Parkinson's disease (PD), but modern MRI approaches have unveiled several complementary markers that are useful for research and clinical applications. Iron- and neuromelanin-sensitive MRI detect qualitative changes in the substantia nigra. Quantitative MRI markers can be derived from diffusion weighted and iron-sensitive imaging or volumetry. Functional brain alterations at rest or during task performance have been captured with functional and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. These markers are useful for the diagnosis of PD and atypical parkinsonism, to track disease progression from the premotor stages of these diseases and to better understand the neurobiological basis of clinical deficits. A current research goal using MRI is to generate time-dependent models of the evolution of PD biomarkers that can help understand neurodegeneration and provide reliable markers for therapeutic trials. This article reviews recent advances in MRI biomarker research at high-field (3T) and ultra high field-imaging (7T) in PD and atypical parkinsonism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)510-525
Number of pages16
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Parkinsonian Disorders
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Parkinson Disease
Iron
Biomarkers
Research
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Task Performance and Analysis
Substantia Nigra
Disease Progression
Brain

Keywords

  • 7T
  • atypical parkinsonism
  • diffusion MRI
  • fMRI
  • iron
  • MRI
  • neuromelanin
  • Parkinson's disease
  • resting state fMRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Lehericy, S., Vaillancourt, D. E., Seppi, K., Monchi, O., Rektorova, I., Antonini, A., ... on behalf of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS)-Neuroimaging Study Group (2017). The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders: Pushing the boundaries forward. Movement Disorders, 32(4), 510-525. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26968

The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders : Pushing the boundaries forward. / Lehericy, Stéphane; Vaillancourt, David E.; Seppi, Klaus; Monchi, Oury; Rektorova, Irena; Antonini, Angelo; McKeown, Martin J.; Masellis, Mario; Berg, Daniela; Rowe, James B.; Lewis, Simon J.G.; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Tessitore, Alessandro; Siebner, Hartwig R.; on behalf of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS)-Neuroimaging Study Group.

In: Movement Disorders, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 510-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Lehericy, S, Vaillancourt, DE, Seppi, K, Monchi, O, Rektorova, I, Antonini, A, McKeown, MJ, Masellis, M, Berg, D, Rowe, JB, Lewis, SJG, Williams-Gray, CH, Tessitore, A, Siebner, HR & on behalf of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS)-Neuroimaging Study Group 2017, 'The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders: Pushing the boundaries forward', Movement Disorders, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 510-525. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26968
Lehericy S, Vaillancourt DE, Seppi K, Monchi O, Rektorova I, Antonini A et al. The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders: Pushing the boundaries forward. Movement Disorders. 2017 Apr 1;32(4):510-525. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26968
Lehericy, Stéphane ; Vaillancourt, David E. ; Seppi, Klaus ; Monchi, Oury ; Rektorova, Irena ; Antonini, Angelo ; McKeown, Martin J. ; Masellis, Mario ; Berg, Daniela ; Rowe, James B. ; Lewis, Simon J.G. ; Williams-Gray, Caroline H. ; Tessitore, Alessandro ; Siebner, Hartwig R. ; on behalf of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS)-Neuroimaging Study Group. / The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders : Pushing the boundaries forward. In: Movement Disorders. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 510-525.
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