The role of long-term-memory and short-term-memory links in the Simon effect

Mariaelena Tagliabue, Marco Zorzi, Carlo Umiltà, Francesca Bassignani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

157 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Experiment 1, children performed a Simon task after a spatially compatible or incompatible task. Results showed a Simon effect after the spatially compatible task and a reversed Simon effect after the spatially incompatible task. In Experiments 2-5, an identical procedure was adopted with adult participants, who performed the Simon task immediately after, a day after, or a week after the spatial compatibility task. Experiment 6 established a baseline for the Simon effect. Results showed a Simon effect after the spatially compatible task and no Simon effect or a reversed Simon effect after the spatially incompatible task. A modified version of the computational model of M. Zorzi and C. Umiltà (1995) was used to compare possible accounts of the findings. The best account exploits 2 types of short-term-memory links between stimulus and response and their interaction with long-term-memory links.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)648-670
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume26
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2000

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Long-Term Memory
Short-Term Memory
Long-term Memory
Short-term Memory
Experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

The role of long-term-memory and short-term-memory links in the Simon effect. / Tagliabue, Mariaelena; Zorzi, Marco; Umiltà, Carlo; Bassignani, Francesca.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol. 26, No. 2, 04.2000, p. 648-670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tagliabue, Mariaelena ; Zorzi, Marco ; Umiltà, Carlo ; Bassignani, Francesca. / The role of long-term-memory and short-term-memory links in the Simon effect. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. 2000 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 648-670.
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