The role of long-term-memory and short-term-memory links in the Simon effect

Mariaelena Tagliabue, Marco Zorzi, Carlo Umiltà, Francesca Bassignani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In Experiment 1, children performed a Simon task after a spatially compatible or incompatible task. Results showed a Simon effect after the spatially compatible task and a reversed Simon effect after the spatially incompatible task. In Experiments 2-5, an identical procedure was adopted with adult participants, who performed the Simon task immediately after, a day after, or a week after the spatial compatibility task. Experiment 6 established a baseline for the Simon effect. Results showed a Simon effect after the spatially compatible task and no Simon effect or a reversed Simon effect after the spatially incompatible task. A modified version of the computational model of M. Zorzi and C. Umiltà (1995) was used to compare possible accounts of the findings. The best account exploits 2 types of short-term-memory links between stimulus and response and their interaction with long-term-memory links.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)648-670
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume26
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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