The role of neuropsychology in distinguishing the posterior cortical atrophy syndrome and alzheimer's disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the neuropsychological hallmarks of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA). Seventeen patients with PCA, 17 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (PAD), and 17 healthy age-matched subjects underwent neuropsychological testing for abstract reasoning, visuospatial abilities, memory, language, executive functions, praxes, and attention. The PCA patients were significantly more impaired in visual perception, spatial memory, visual attention, and visuospatial reasoning compared to the PAD patients who were relatively more impaired in episodic memory. In the PCA group, no test score correlated with disease duration or age of clinical onset, whereas, in the PAD group, several scores correlated with disease duration. Compared to the healthy subjects, both patient groups showed multiple cognitive deficits. Thus, PCA is characterised by distinctive visuospatial deficits that reflect the distribution of brain damage and contrast with the memory impairment of PAD patients. Specific neuropsychological tests may contribute to early identification of cortical dementia for diagnostic and research purposes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-70
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cognitive functions
  • Dementia
  • Memory
  • Neuropsychological assessment
  • Posterior cortical atrophy
  • Progressive visual agnosia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of neuropsychology in distinguishing the posterior cortical atrophy syndrome and alzheimer's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this