The role of perceptual learning on modality-specific visual attentional effects

M. Chirimuuta, David Burr, M. Concetta Morrone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Morrone et al. [Morrone, M. C., Denti, V., & Spinelli, D. (2002). Color and luminance contrasts attract independent attention. Current Biology, 12, 1134-1137] reported that the detrimental effect on contrast discrimination thresholds of performing a concomitant task is modality specific: performing a secondary luminance task has no effect on colour contrast thresholds, and vice versa. Here we confirm this result with a novel task involving learning of spatial position, and go on to show that it is not specific to the cardinal colour axes: secondary tasks with red-green stimuli impede performance on a blue-yellow task and vice versa. We further show that the attentional effect can be abolished with continued training over 2-4 training days (2-20 training sessions), and that the effect of learning is transferable to new target positions. Given the finding of transference, we discuss the possibility that V4 is a site of plasticity for both stimulus types, and that the separation is due to a luminance-colour separation within this cortical area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-70
Number of pages11
JournalVision Research
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Colour
  • Contrast discrimination
  • Perceptual learning
  • Plasticity
  • Pop-out
  • V4
  • Ventral stream
  • Visual search

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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