The Sound of Actions in Apraxia

Mariella Pazzaglia, Luigi Pizzamiglio, Emiliano Pes, Salvatore Maria Aglioti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies in nonhuman and human primates have demonstrated that sound-producing actions are mapped on the same mirror circuits that are activated during the visual recognition and execution of actions [1-12]. However, no causative link between the auditory recognition and execution of actions has been provided thus far. Here, we sought to determine whether patients with apraxia, who are by definition impaired in performing specific gestures, are also impaired in recognizing sounds specifically linked to human actions. Twenty-eight left-hemisphere-damaged patients with or without limb and/or buccofacial apraxia and seven right-hemisphere-damaged patients with no apraxia were asked to match sounds evoking human-related actions or nonhuman action sounds with specific visual pictures. Hand and mouth action-related sound recognition were specifically impaired in limb and buccofacial apraxia patients, respectively. Lesional mapping revealed that the left frontoparietal cortex is crucial for recognizing the sound of limb movements. By contrast, the left inferior frontal gyrus and adjacent insular cortex are causatively associated with recognition of buccofacial-related action sounds. These behavioral and neural double dissociations indicate that a left-lateralized multimodal mirror network is actively involved in the body-part-specific motor mapping of limb and mouth action-related sounds, as well as in the execution of the very same actions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1766-1772
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume18
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 25 2008

Fingerprint

Apraxias
Acoustic waves
limbs (animal)
Extremities
Mouth
mouth
cortex
Mirrors
Gestures
Prefrontal Cortex
Human Body
Cerebral Cortex
Primates
hands
Hand
Networks (circuits)

Keywords

  • SYSNEURO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Pazzaglia, M., Pizzamiglio, L., Pes, E., & Aglioti, S. M. (2008). The Sound of Actions in Apraxia. Current Biology, 18(22), 1766-1772. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2008.09.061

The Sound of Actions in Apraxia. / Pazzaglia, Mariella; Pizzamiglio, Luigi; Pes, Emiliano; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 18, No. 22, 25.11.2008, p. 1766-1772.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pazzaglia, M, Pizzamiglio, L, Pes, E & Aglioti, SM 2008, 'The Sound of Actions in Apraxia', Current Biology, vol. 18, no. 22, pp. 1766-1772. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2008.09.061
Pazzaglia M, Pizzamiglio L, Pes E, Aglioti SM. The Sound of Actions in Apraxia. Current Biology. 2008 Nov 25;18(22):1766-1772. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2008.09.061
Pazzaglia, Mariella ; Pizzamiglio, Luigi ; Pes, Emiliano ; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria. / The Sound of Actions in Apraxia. In: Current Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 18, No. 22. pp. 1766-1772.
@article{389c1ad9b48e4e3a96d6fe9476ff23eb,
title = "The Sound of Actions in Apraxia",
abstract = "Studies in nonhuman and human primates have demonstrated that sound-producing actions are mapped on the same mirror circuits that are activated during the visual recognition and execution of actions [1-12]. However, no causative link between the auditory recognition and execution of actions has been provided thus far. Here, we sought to determine whether patients with apraxia, who are by definition impaired in performing specific gestures, are also impaired in recognizing sounds specifically linked to human actions. Twenty-eight left-hemisphere-damaged patients with or without limb and/or buccofacial apraxia and seven right-hemisphere-damaged patients with no apraxia were asked to match sounds evoking human-related actions or nonhuman action sounds with specific visual pictures. Hand and mouth action-related sound recognition were specifically impaired in limb and buccofacial apraxia patients, respectively. Lesional mapping revealed that the left frontoparietal cortex is crucial for recognizing the sound of limb movements. By contrast, the left inferior frontal gyrus and adjacent insular cortex are causatively associated with recognition of buccofacial-related action sounds. These behavioral and neural double dissociations indicate that a left-lateralized multimodal mirror network is actively involved in the body-part-specific motor mapping of limb and mouth action-related sounds, as well as in the execution of the very same actions.",
keywords = "SYSNEURO",
author = "Mariella Pazzaglia and Luigi Pizzamiglio and Emiliano Pes and Aglioti, {Salvatore Maria}",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1016/j.cub.2008.09.061",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "1766--1772",
journal = "Current Biology",
issn = "0960-9822",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "22",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Sound of Actions in Apraxia

AU - Pazzaglia, Mariella

AU - Pizzamiglio, Luigi

AU - Pes, Emiliano

AU - Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

PY - 2008/11/25

Y1 - 2008/11/25

N2 - Studies in nonhuman and human primates have demonstrated that sound-producing actions are mapped on the same mirror circuits that are activated during the visual recognition and execution of actions [1-12]. However, no causative link between the auditory recognition and execution of actions has been provided thus far. Here, we sought to determine whether patients with apraxia, who are by definition impaired in performing specific gestures, are also impaired in recognizing sounds specifically linked to human actions. Twenty-eight left-hemisphere-damaged patients with or without limb and/or buccofacial apraxia and seven right-hemisphere-damaged patients with no apraxia were asked to match sounds evoking human-related actions or nonhuman action sounds with specific visual pictures. Hand and mouth action-related sound recognition were specifically impaired in limb and buccofacial apraxia patients, respectively. Lesional mapping revealed that the left frontoparietal cortex is crucial for recognizing the sound of limb movements. By contrast, the left inferior frontal gyrus and adjacent insular cortex are causatively associated with recognition of buccofacial-related action sounds. These behavioral and neural double dissociations indicate that a left-lateralized multimodal mirror network is actively involved in the body-part-specific motor mapping of limb and mouth action-related sounds, as well as in the execution of the very same actions.

AB - Studies in nonhuman and human primates have demonstrated that sound-producing actions are mapped on the same mirror circuits that are activated during the visual recognition and execution of actions [1-12]. However, no causative link between the auditory recognition and execution of actions has been provided thus far. Here, we sought to determine whether patients with apraxia, who are by definition impaired in performing specific gestures, are also impaired in recognizing sounds specifically linked to human actions. Twenty-eight left-hemisphere-damaged patients with or without limb and/or buccofacial apraxia and seven right-hemisphere-damaged patients with no apraxia were asked to match sounds evoking human-related actions or nonhuman action sounds with specific visual pictures. Hand and mouth action-related sound recognition were specifically impaired in limb and buccofacial apraxia patients, respectively. Lesional mapping revealed that the left frontoparietal cortex is crucial for recognizing the sound of limb movements. By contrast, the left inferior frontal gyrus and adjacent insular cortex are causatively associated with recognition of buccofacial-related action sounds. These behavioral and neural double dissociations indicate that a left-lateralized multimodal mirror network is actively involved in the body-part-specific motor mapping of limb and mouth action-related sounds, as well as in the execution of the very same actions.

KW - SYSNEURO

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=56349093067&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=56349093067&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cub.2008.09.061

DO - 10.1016/j.cub.2008.09.061

M3 - Article

C2 - 19013068

AN - SCOPUS:56349093067

VL - 18

SP - 1766

EP - 1772

JO - Current Biology

JF - Current Biology

SN - 0960-9822

IS - 22

ER -