The specificity of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test for recreational soccer players is independent of their intermittent running ability

Giuseppe Coratella, Marco Beato, Federico Schena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether or not recreational soccer players (SP) and non-soccer players (non-SP) with similar intermittent-running ability had similar physiological responses to a soccer match-simulation protocol. Twenty-two recreational SP and 19 fitness-matched non-SP participated. Yo-Yo level 1 assessed intermittent-running ability, while the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test served as soccer match-simulation protocol. Heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration [La] and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded after each bout (1–5, plus an exhaustive task). SP had lower HR after the third, fourth and fifth bout, compared to non-SP. Similarly, SP had lower [La] after the third, fourth and the fifth bout. SP also had lower RPE after the third, fourth and fifth bout. The appropriateness of intermittent-running ability as the main determinant of physical performance in SP was questioned.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalResearch in Sports Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Aug 20 2016

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Soccer
Running
Heart Rate
Lactic Acid

Keywords

  • Intermittent recovery test level 1
  • rating of perceived exertion
  • repeated-sprint ability
  • shuttle running
  • soccer match simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

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abstract = "The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether or not recreational soccer players (SP) and non-soccer players (non-SP) with similar intermittent-running ability had similar physiological responses to a soccer match-simulation protocol. Twenty-two recreational SP and 19 fitness-matched non-SP participated. Yo-Yo level 1 assessed intermittent-running ability, while the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test served as soccer match-simulation protocol. Heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration [La−] and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded after each bout (1–5, plus an exhaustive task). SP had lower HR after the third, fourth and fifth bout, compared to non-SP. Similarly, SP had lower [La−] after the third, fourth and the fifth bout. SP also had lower RPE after the third, fourth and fifth bout. The appropriateness of intermittent-running ability as the main determinant of physical performance in SP was questioned.",
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