The spinal cord independence measure: How much change is clinically significant for spinal cord injury subjects

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To calculate the clinical significance of the SCIM III according to distribution-based approaches. Method: Retrospective review of the charts of 255 patients with registration of the total SCIM and of the four subscales. Clinical significance was calculated per several distribution-based approaches. The calculated clinical significance was compared with improvements by the patients to determine the percentage of patients who achieved significant improvement. Results: An improvement of at least 4 points of the total SCIM is needed to obtain a small significant improvement and of 10 points to obtain a substantial improvement. Based on these results, the percentages of patients who achieved an improvement varied from 60% to 100%. Conclusions: The results provide benchmarks for clinicians and researchers to interpret whether patients' change score on the SCIM III can be interpreted as true or clinically meaningful and to make clinical judgments about the patients' progress.Implications for RehabilitationAn improvement of at least four points of the total SCIM is needed to obtain a small significant improvement and of 10 points to obtain a substantial improvement.The results provide benchmarks for clinicians and researchers to interpret whether patients' change score on the SCIM III can be interpreted as true or clinically meaningful and to make clinical judgments about the patients' progress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1808-1813
Number of pages6
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
Volume35
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

Keywords

  • Clinical significance
  • Spinal cord independence measure
  • Spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

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