The thalamus and brainstem act as key hubs in alterations of human brain network connectivity induced by mild propofol sedation

Tommaso Gili, Neeraj Saxena, Ana Diukova, Kevin Murphy, Judith E. Hall, Richard G. Wise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite their routine use during surgical procedures, no consensus has yet been reached on the precise mechanisms by which hypnotic anesthetic agents produce their effects. Molecular, animal and human studies have suggested disruption of thalamocortical communication as a key component of anesthetic action at the brain systems level. Here, we used the anesthetic agent, propofol, to modulate consciousness and to evaluate differences in the interactions of remote neural networks during altered consciousness. We investigated the effects of propofol, at a dose that produced mild sedation without loss of consciousness, on spontaneous cerebral activity of 15 healthy volunteers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), exploiting oscillations (

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4024-4031
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 27 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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