The use of viscoelastic haemostatic assays in non-cardiac surgical settings: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Massimo Franchini, Carlo Mengoli, Mario Cruciani, Marco Marietta, Giuseppe Marano, Stefania Vaglio, Simonetta Pupella, Eva Veropalumbo, Francesca Masiello, Giancarlo M. Liumbruno

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) are viscoelastic haemostatic assays (VHA) which exploit the elastic properties of clotting blood. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the usefulness of these tests in bleeding patients outside the cardiac surgical setting. Materials and methods: We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and SCOPUS. We also searched clinical trial registries for ongoing and unpublished studies, and checked reference lists to identify additional studies. Results: We found 4 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that met our inclusion criteria with a total of 229 participants. The sample size was small (from 28 to 111 patients) and the follow-up periods very heterogenous (from 4 weeks to 3 years). Pooled data from the 3 trials reporting on mortality (199 participants) do not show any effect of the use of TEG on mortality as compared to standard monitoring (based on the average treatment effect from a fixed-effects model): Risk Ratio (RR) 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.43 to 1.16. Likewise, the use of VHA does not reduce the need for red blood cells (mean difference -0.64; 95% CI: -1.51 to 0.23), platelet concentrates (mean difference -1.12; 95% CI: -3.25 to 1.02), and fresh frozen plasma (mean difference -0.91; 95% CI: -2.02 to 0.19) transfusion. The evidence on mortality and other outcomes was uncertain (very low-certainty evidence, down-graded due to risk of biases, imprecision, and inconsistency). Conclusions: Overall, the certainty of the evidence provided by the trials was too low for us to be certain of the benefits and harms of viscoelastic haemostatic assay in non-cardiac surgical settings. More, larger, and better-designed RCTs should be carried out in this area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-243
Number of pages9
JournalBlood Transfusion
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hemostatics
Thrombelastography
Meta-Analysis
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
Randomized Controlled Trials
Blood Coagulation
MEDLINE
Sample Size
Libraries
Registries
Blood Platelets
Erythrocytes
Odds Ratio
Clinical Trials
Hemorrhage
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Allogeneic blood transfusion
  • Bleeding
  • ROTEM
  • TEG
  • Viscoelastic assay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Hematology

Cite this

The use of viscoelastic haemostatic assays in non-cardiac surgical settings : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Franchini, Massimo; Mengoli, Carlo; Cruciani, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Marano, Giuseppe; Vaglio, Stefania; Pupella, Simonetta; Veropalumbo, Eva; Masiello, Francesca; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

In: Blood Transfusion, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.01.2018, p. 235-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Franchini, Massimo ; Mengoli, Carlo ; Cruciani, Mario ; Marietta, Marco ; Marano, Giuseppe ; Vaglio, Stefania ; Pupella, Simonetta ; Veropalumbo, Eva ; Masiello, Francesca ; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M. / The use of viscoelastic haemostatic assays in non-cardiac surgical settings : A systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Blood Transfusion. 2018 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 235-243.
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abstract = "Background: Thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) are viscoelastic haemostatic assays (VHA) which exploit the elastic properties of clotting blood. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the usefulness of these tests in bleeding patients outside the cardiac surgical setting. Materials and methods: We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and SCOPUS. We also searched clinical trial registries for ongoing and unpublished studies, and checked reference lists to identify additional studies. Results: We found 4 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that met our inclusion criteria with a total of 229 participants. The sample size was small (from 28 to 111 patients) and the follow-up periods very heterogenous (from 4 weeks to 3 years). Pooled data from the 3 trials reporting on mortality (199 participants) do not show any effect of the use of TEG on mortality as compared to standard monitoring (based on the average treatment effect from a fixed-effects model): Risk Ratio (RR) 0.71; 95{\%} Confidence Interval (CI): 0.43 to 1.16. Likewise, the use of VHA does not reduce the need for red blood cells (mean difference -0.64; 95{\%} CI: -1.51 to 0.23), platelet concentrates (mean difference -1.12; 95{\%} CI: -3.25 to 1.02), and fresh frozen plasma (mean difference -0.91; 95{\%} CI: -2.02 to 0.19) transfusion. The evidence on mortality and other outcomes was uncertain (very low-certainty evidence, down-graded due to risk of biases, imprecision, and inconsistency). Conclusions: Overall, the certainty of the evidence provided by the trials was too low for us to be certain of the benefits and harms of viscoelastic haemostatic assay in non-cardiac surgical settings. More, larger, and better-designed RCTs should be carried out in this area.",
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AU - Mengoli, Carlo

AU - Cruciani, Mario

AU - Marietta, Marco

AU - Marano, Giuseppe

AU - Vaglio, Stefania

AU - Pupella, Simonetta

AU - Veropalumbo, Eva

AU - Masiello, Francesca

AU - Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

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N2 - Background: Thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) are viscoelastic haemostatic assays (VHA) which exploit the elastic properties of clotting blood. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the usefulness of these tests in bleeding patients outside the cardiac surgical setting. Materials and methods: We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and SCOPUS. We also searched clinical trial registries for ongoing and unpublished studies, and checked reference lists to identify additional studies. Results: We found 4 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that met our inclusion criteria with a total of 229 participants. The sample size was small (from 28 to 111 patients) and the follow-up periods very heterogenous (from 4 weeks to 3 years). Pooled data from the 3 trials reporting on mortality (199 participants) do not show any effect of the use of TEG on mortality as compared to standard monitoring (based on the average treatment effect from a fixed-effects model): Risk Ratio (RR) 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.43 to 1.16. Likewise, the use of VHA does not reduce the need for red blood cells (mean difference -0.64; 95% CI: -1.51 to 0.23), platelet concentrates (mean difference -1.12; 95% CI: -3.25 to 1.02), and fresh frozen plasma (mean difference -0.91; 95% CI: -2.02 to 0.19) transfusion. The evidence on mortality and other outcomes was uncertain (very low-certainty evidence, down-graded due to risk of biases, imprecision, and inconsistency). Conclusions: Overall, the certainty of the evidence provided by the trials was too low for us to be certain of the benefits and harms of viscoelastic haemostatic assay in non-cardiac surgical settings. More, larger, and better-designed RCTs should be carried out in this area.

AB - Background: Thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) are viscoelastic haemostatic assays (VHA) which exploit the elastic properties of clotting blood. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the usefulness of these tests in bleeding patients outside the cardiac surgical setting. Materials and methods: We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and SCOPUS. We also searched clinical trial registries for ongoing and unpublished studies, and checked reference lists to identify additional studies. Results: We found 4 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that met our inclusion criteria with a total of 229 participants. The sample size was small (from 28 to 111 patients) and the follow-up periods very heterogenous (from 4 weeks to 3 years). Pooled data from the 3 trials reporting on mortality (199 participants) do not show any effect of the use of TEG on mortality as compared to standard monitoring (based on the average treatment effect from a fixed-effects model): Risk Ratio (RR) 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.43 to 1.16. Likewise, the use of VHA does not reduce the need for red blood cells (mean difference -0.64; 95% CI: -1.51 to 0.23), platelet concentrates (mean difference -1.12; 95% CI: -3.25 to 1.02), and fresh frozen plasma (mean difference -0.91; 95% CI: -2.02 to 0.19) transfusion. The evidence on mortality and other outcomes was uncertain (very low-certainty evidence, down-graded due to risk of biases, imprecision, and inconsistency). Conclusions: Overall, the certainty of the evidence provided by the trials was too low for us to be certain of the benefits and harms of viscoelastic haemostatic assay in non-cardiac surgical settings. More, larger, and better-designed RCTs should be carried out in this area.

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