The vestibulo-ocular reflex and angular displacement perception in darkness in humans: Adaptation to a virtual environment

Y. P. Ivanenko, I. Viaud-Delmon, I. Siegler, I. Israël, A. Berthoz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and angular displacement perception were measured in 25 healthy humans in darkness before and after exposure to incoherent visual-vestibular stimulation (VVS): 45 min of repeated passive 180 whole-body rotations around the vertical axis concurrent with only 90 rotation in a visual virtual square room. Large inter-individual variability was observed for both VOR gain and turning estimates. The individual VOR gains were not correlated with perceived angles of rotation either before or after VVS. After VVS, the angular displacement perception decreased by 24 16% while the VOR gain did not change significantly. The results suggest that adaptive plasticity in turning perception and adaptive plasticity in VOR might be independent of one another.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-170
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume241
Issue number2-3
Publication statusPublished - Jan 30 1998

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Human
  • Spatial orientation
  • Vestibulo-ocular reflex
  • Virtual reality
  • Visual-vestibular interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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