Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

G. Ristagno, W. Tang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Patients who are successfully resuscitated following cardiac arrest often present with what is now termed 'post-resuscitation disease' [1]. Most prominent, are post-resuscitation myocardial failure and ischemic brain damage. Although post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction has been implicated as an important mechanism accounting for fatal outcomes after cardiac resuscitation [2-4], morbidity and mortality after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) largely also depends on recovery of neurologic function. As many as 30 % of survivors of cardiac arrest in fact manifest permanent brain damage [5-7]. The greatest post-resuscitation emphasis has been on long-term neurologically intact survival [8]. Evidence favoring correction of electrolyte and glucose abnormalities, control of post-resuscitation cardiac rate, rhythm, systemic blood pressure, and intravascular volumes are cited but objective proof of these interventions is still anedoctal. Of all interventions, the most persuasive benefits have followed the use of hypothermia [8].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationYearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2009
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages589-599
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9780387922775
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Induced Hypothermia
Heart Arrest
Resuscitation
Fatal Outcome
Recovery of Function
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Brain
Hypothermia
Nervous System
Electrolytes
Survivors
Heart Failure
Blood Pressure
Morbidity
Glucose
Survival
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ristagno, G., & Tang, W. (2007). Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. In Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2009 (pp. 589-599). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-92278-2_55

Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. / Ristagno, G.; Tang, W.

Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2009. Springer New York, 2007. p. 589-599.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Ristagno, G & Tang, W 2007, Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. in Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2009. Springer New York, pp. 589-599. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-92278-2_55
Ristagno G, Tang W. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. In Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2009. Springer New York. 2007. p. 589-599 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-92278-2_55
Ristagno, G. ; Tang, W. / Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2009. Springer New York, 2007. pp. 589-599
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