Therapeutic renaissance of thalidomide in the treatment of haematological malignancies

D. Ribatti, A. Vacca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Very few drugs had a history similar to that of thalidomide (α-N-[phthalimido] gluramide). First introduced in the late 1950s in Germany, in 1961 thalidomide was withdrawn due to its teratogenic effects. More than three decades after, it is attracting growing interest because of its reported immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. The discovery that thalidomide inhibits angiogenesis led to preclinical and clinical trials as an anticancer agent in the treatment of solid tumours and haematological malignancies, as summarized in this review article. More recently, structural analogues of thalidomide have been synthesized in order to explore potential molecular targets of thalidomide, as well as to identify new agents with improved therapeutic efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1525-1531
Number of pages7
JournalLeukemia
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

Fingerprint

Thalidomide
Hematologic Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Antineoplastic Agents
Germany
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
History
Renaissance
Clinical Trials
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Antiangiogenesis
  • Haematological malignancies
  • Thalidomide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Therapeutic renaissance of thalidomide in the treatment of haematological malignancies. / Ribatti, D.; Vacca, A.

In: Leukemia, Vol. 19, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 1525-1531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ribatti, D. ; Vacca, A. / Therapeutic renaissance of thalidomide in the treatment of haematological malignancies. In: Leukemia. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 9. pp. 1525-1531.
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