Three hematologic malignancies in the same patient: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, followed by chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia

Bruno Fattizzo, Tommaso Radice, Daniele Cattaneo, Mauro Pomati, Wilma Barcellini, Alessandra Iurlo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The co-existence of both chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been described in a few cases, either simultaneously or subsequently presenting. We report an unusual case of three hematological malignancies in the same patient: CLL, CML, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). None of the three malignancies shared the same origin, since the marrow sample was negative for BCR-ABL1 transcript at the time of CLL diagnosis, CLL was in remission at CML diagnosis, and CML was in complete cytogenetic response at AML onset, indicating that this was not a blast crisis.

Background: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are the most common proliferative disorders in Western countries, with an incidence of 4.2/100,000/year and 1-1.5/100,000/year, respectively [1-2]. The co-existence of both CML and CLL is an extremely rare event, even if it has been described in a few cases, either simultaneously or subsequently presenting [3]. Above all, the presence of more than two different hematologic neoplasms has not been described in literature so far. In the present study we report a particular case of a CLL patient, who first developed CML and then acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1929-1932
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Laboratory
Volume60
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Acute myeloid leukemia
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
  • Chronic myeloid leukemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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