Thrombotic complications in adult patients with lymphoma: A meta-analysis of 29 independent cohorts including 18 018 patients and 1149 events

Vanesa Caruso, Augusto Di Castelnuovo, Susana Meschengieser, Maria A. Lazzari, Giovanni De Gaetano, Sergio Storti, Licia Iacoviello, Maria Benedetta Donati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Thrombotic complications in hematologic malignancies have important clinical implications. In this meta-analysis we sought to obtain accurate estimates of the thrombotic risk in lymphoma patients. Articles were searched in electronic databases and references. Eighteen articles were identified (29 cohorts, 18 018 patients and 1149 events). Pooled incidence rates (IRs) were calculated by the use of a method based on the exact maximum likelihood binomial distribution. The global IR of thrombosis was 6.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.0%-6.8%). The global IRs of venous or arterial events were 5.3% (95% CI, 5.0%-5.7%) and 1.1% (95% CI, 0.9%-1.2%), respectively. The IR of thrombosis observed in subjects with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was 6.5% (95% CI, 6.1%-6.9%), significantly greater than that observed for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (4.7%; 95% CI, 3.9%-5.6%). Within NHL, patients with high-grade disease had a greater risk of events (IR 8.3%; 95% CI, 7.0%-9.9%) than low-grade disease (IR 6.3%; 95% CI, 4.5%-8.9%). This meta-analysis shows that the IR of thrombosis in lymphoma patients is quite high, especially in those with NHL at an advanced stage of the disease. These results may help better defining lymphoma populations at high thrombotic risk, to whom prophylactic approaches could be preferentially applied.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5322-5328
Number of pages7
JournalBlood
Volume115
Issue number26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology

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