Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Suppression for Protection Against Hypothyroidism Due to Craniospinal Irradiation for Childhood Medulloblastoma/Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

Maura Massimino, Lorenza Gandola, Paola Collini, Ettore Seregni, Alfonso Marchianò, Annalisa Serra, Emanuele Pignoli, Filippo Spreafico, Federica Pallotti, Monica Terenziani, Veronica Biassoni, Emilio Bombardieri, Franca Fossati-Bellani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Hypothyroidism is one of the earliest endocrine effects of craniospinal irradiation (CSI). The effects of radiation also depend on circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which acts as an indicator of thyrocyte function and is the most sensitive marker of thyroid damage. Hence, our study was launched in 1998 to evaluate the protective effect of TSH suppression during CSI for medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Patients and Methods: From Jan 1998 to Feb 2001, a total of 37 euthyroid children scheduled for CSI for medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor underwent thyroid ultrasound and free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and TSH evaluation at the beginning and end of CSI. From 14 days before and up to the end of CSI, patients were administered l-thyroxine at suppressive doses; every 3 days, TSH suppression was checked to ensure a value

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)404-410
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2007

Keywords

  • Childhood brain tumors
  • Craniospinal irradiation
  • Iatrogenic hypothyroidism
  • Thyroid protection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation

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