Timing in the cerebellum

oscillations and resonance in the granular layer

E. D'Angelo, S. K E Koekkoek, P. Lombardo, S. Solinas, E. Ros, J. Garrido, M. Schonewille, C. I. De Zeeuw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain generates many rhythmic activities, and the olivo-cerebellar system is not an exception. In recent years, the cerebellum has revealed activities ranging from low frequency to very high-frequency oscillations. These rhythms depend on the brain functional state and are typical of certain circuit sections or specific neurons. Interestingly, the granular layer, which gates sensorimotor and cognitive signals to the cerebellar cortex, can also sustain low frequency (7-25 Hz) and perhaps higher-frequency oscillations. In this review we have considered (i) how these oscillations are generated in the granular layer network depending on intrinsic electroresponsiveness and circuit connections, (ii) how these oscillations are correlated with those in other cerebellar circuit sections, and (iii) how the oscillating cerebellum communicates with extracerebellar structures. It is suggested that the granular layer can generate oscillations that integrate well with those generated in the inferior olive, in deep-cerebellar nuclei and in Purkinje cells. These rhythms, in turn, might play a role in cognition and memory consolidation by interacting with the mechanisms of long-term synaptic plasticity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)805-815
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroscience
Volume162
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2009

Fingerprint

Cerebellum
Cerebellar Nuclei
Cerebellar Cortex
Neuronal Plasticity
Purkinje Cells
Brain
Cognition
Neurons
Memory Consolidation

Keywords

  • cerebellum
  • Golgi cells
  • granular layer
  • granule cells
  • oscillations
  • resonance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

D'Angelo, E., Koekkoek, S. K. E., Lombardo, P., Solinas, S., Ros, E., Garrido, J., ... De Zeeuw, C. I. (2009). Timing in the cerebellum: oscillations and resonance in the granular layer. Neuroscience, 162(3), 805-815. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2009.01.048

Timing in the cerebellum : oscillations and resonance in the granular layer. / D'Angelo, E.; Koekkoek, S. K E; Lombardo, P.; Solinas, S.; Ros, E.; Garrido, J.; Schonewille, M.; De Zeeuw, C. I.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 162, No. 3, 01.09.2009, p. 805-815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

D'Angelo, E, Koekkoek, SKE, Lombardo, P, Solinas, S, Ros, E, Garrido, J, Schonewille, M & De Zeeuw, CI 2009, 'Timing in the cerebellum: oscillations and resonance in the granular layer', Neuroscience, vol. 162, no. 3, pp. 805-815. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2009.01.048
D'Angelo, E. ; Koekkoek, S. K E ; Lombardo, P. ; Solinas, S. ; Ros, E. ; Garrido, J. ; Schonewille, M. ; De Zeeuw, C. I. / Timing in the cerebellum : oscillations and resonance in the granular layer. In: Neuroscience. 2009 ; Vol. 162, No. 3. pp. 805-815.
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