Timing, setting and incidence of cardiovascular complications in patients with acute myocardial infarction submitted to primary percutaneous coronary intervention

Cristina Gigliolli, Massimo Margheri, Serafina Valente, Marco Comeglio, Chiara Lazzeri, Tania Chechi, Corinna Armentano, Salvatore Mario Romano, Massimiliano Falai, Gian Franco Gensini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: At the Istituto di Clinica Medica Generale e Cardiologia (Florence, Italy), the widespread use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has markedly changed the hospital course of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These patients are typically transferred to the coronary care unit (CCU) only after primary PCI, whereas during the thrombolytic era, patients were first admitted to CCU before reperfusion. Objectives and methods: The incidence, timing and setting of complications from symptom onset to hospital discharge in 689 consecutive AMI patients undergoing PCI were evaluated. Results: Ventricular fibrillation occurred in 11% of patients, and most episodes (94.7%) occurred before or during PCI. Of all patients, 6.3% developed complete atrioventricular block (CAVB), and in 86.3% of these cases, the CAVB occurred before or during PCI; in 94.5%, a CAVB resolution occurred in the catheterization laboratory (CL). Thirty-one patients (4.5%) had impending shock on admission to the CL. Cardiogenic shock developed in 29 patients (4.2%), mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. Only four patients (less than 1%) developed cardiogenic shock later during their hospital course. Similarly, circulatory and ventilatory support, as well as temporary pacing and cardiac defibrillation, were used mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. During the CCU stay, 45 patients (6.5%) had hemorrhagic or vascular complications, and the incidence of post-PCI ischemia and early reocclusion of the culprit vessel were low (2.1% and 0.6%, respectively). Thus, cardiac complications usually associated with AMI were observed mainly before hospital admission or in the CL during the reopening of the target vessel. These complications were rarely observed after a successful PCI. Conclusions: For AMI patients, the CL is not only the site of PCI, it is also where most life-threatening cardiac complications are observed and treated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1047-1052
Number of pages6
JournalCanadian Journal of Cardiology
Volume22
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2006

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Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Myocardial Infarction
Incidence
Catheterization
Coronary Care Units
Atrioventricular Block
Cardiogenic Shock
Ventricular Fibrillation
Italy
Reperfusion
Blood Vessels
Shock
Ischemia

Keywords

  • Angioplasty
  • Complications
  • Myocardial infarction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Gigliolli, C., Margheri, M., Valente, S., Comeglio, M., Lazzeri, C., Chechi, T., ... Gensini, G. F. (2006). Timing, setting and incidence of cardiovascular complications in patients with acute myocardial infarction submitted to primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Canadian Journal of Cardiology, 22(12), 1047-1052.

Timing, setting and incidence of cardiovascular complications in patients with acute myocardial infarction submitted to primary percutaneous coronary intervention. / Gigliolli, Cristina; Margheri, Massimo; Valente, Serafina; Comeglio, Marco; Lazzeri, Chiara; Chechi, Tania; Armentano, Corinna; Romano, Salvatore Mario; Falai, Massimiliano; Gensini, Gian Franco.

In: Canadian Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 22, No. 12, 10.2006, p. 1047-1052.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gigliolli, C, Margheri, M, Valente, S, Comeglio, M, Lazzeri, C, Chechi, T, Armentano, C, Romano, SM, Falai, M & Gensini, GF 2006, 'Timing, setting and incidence of cardiovascular complications in patients with acute myocardial infarction submitted to primary percutaneous coronary intervention', Canadian Journal of Cardiology, vol. 22, no. 12, pp. 1047-1052.
Gigliolli, Cristina ; Margheri, Massimo ; Valente, Serafina ; Comeglio, Marco ; Lazzeri, Chiara ; Chechi, Tania ; Armentano, Corinna ; Romano, Salvatore Mario ; Falai, Massimiliano ; Gensini, Gian Franco. / Timing, setting and incidence of cardiovascular complications in patients with acute myocardial infarction submitted to primary percutaneous coronary intervention. In: Canadian Journal of Cardiology. 2006 ; Vol. 22, No. 12. pp. 1047-1052.
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abstract = "Background: At the Istituto di Clinica Medica Generale e Cardiologia (Florence, Italy), the widespread use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has markedly changed the hospital course of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These patients are typically transferred to the coronary care unit (CCU) only after primary PCI, whereas during the thrombolytic era, patients were first admitted to CCU before reperfusion. Objectives and methods: The incidence, timing and setting of complications from symptom onset to hospital discharge in 689 consecutive AMI patients undergoing PCI were evaluated. Results: Ventricular fibrillation occurred in 11{\%} of patients, and most episodes (94.7{\%}) occurred before or during PCI. Of all patients, 6.3{\%} developed complete atrioventricular block (CAVB), and in 86.3{\%} of these cases, the CAVB occurred before or during PCI; in 94.5{\%}, a CAVB resolution occurred in the catheterization laboratory (CL). Thirty-one patients (4.5{\%}) had impending shock on admission to the CL. Cardiogenic shock developed in 29 patients (4.2{\%}), mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. Only four patients (less than 1{\%}) developed cardiogenic shock later during their hospital course. Similarly, circulatory and ventilatory support, as well as temporary pacing and cardiac defibrillation, were used mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. During the CCU stay, 45 patients (6.5{\%}) had hemorrhagic or vascular complications, and the incidence of post-PCI ischemia and early reocclusion of the culprit vessel were low (2.1{\%} and 0.6{\%}, respectively). Thus, cardiac complications usually associated with AMI were observed mainly before hospital admission or in the CL during the reopening of the target vessel. These complications were rarely observed after a successful PCI. Conclusions: For AMI patients, the CL is not only the site of PCI, it is also where most life-threatening cardiac complications are observed and treated.",
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T1 - Timing, setting and incidence of cardiovascular complications in patients with acute myocardial infarction submitted to primary percutaneous coronary intervention

AU - Gigliolli, Cristina

AU - Margheri, Massimo

AU - Valente, Serafina

AU - Comeglio, Marco

AU - Lazzeri, Chiara

AU - Chechi, Tania

AU - Armentano, Corinna

AU - Romano, Salvatore Mario

AU - Falai, Massimiliano

AU - Gensini, Gian Franco

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N2 - Background: At the Istituto di Clinica Medica Generale e Cardiologia (Florence, Italy), the widespread use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has markedly changed the hospital course of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These patients are typically transferred to the coronary care unit (CCU) only after primary PCI, whereas during the thrombolytic era, patients were first admitted to CCU before reperfusion. Objectives and methods: The incidence, timing and setting of complications from symptom onset to hospital discharge in 689 consecutive AMI patients undergoing PCI were evaluated. Results: Ventricular fibrillation occurred in 11% of patients, and most episodes (94.7%) occurred before or during PCI. Of all patients, 6.3% developed complete atrioventricular block (CAVB), and in 86.3% of these cases, the CAVB occurred before or during PCI; in 94.5%, a CAVB resolution occurred in the catheterization laboratory (CL). Thirty-one patients (4.5%) had impending shock on admission to the CL. Cardiogenic shock developed in 29 patients (4.2%), mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. Only four patients (less than 1%) developed cardiogenic shock later during their hospital course. Similarly, circulatory and ventilatory support, as well as temporary pacing and cardiac defibrillation, were used mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. During the CCU stay, 45 patients (6.5%) had hemorrhagic or vascular complications, and the incidence of post-PCI ischemia and early reocclusion of the culprit vessel were low (2.1% and 0.6%, respectively). Thus, cardiac complications usually associated with AMI were observed mainly before hospital admission or in the CL during the reopening of the target vessel. These complications were rarely observed after a successful PCI. Conclusions: For AMI patients, the CL is not only the site of PCI, it is also where most life-threatening cardiac complications are observed and treated.

AB - Background: At the Istituto di Clinica Medica Generale e Cardiologia (Florence, Italy), the widespread use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has markedly changed the hospital course of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These patients are typically transferred to the coronary care unit (CCU) only after primary PCI, whereas during the thrombolytic era, patients were first admitted to CCU before reperfusion. Objectives and methods: The incidence, timing and setting of complications from symptom onset to hospital discharge in 689 consecutive AMI patients undergoing PCI were evaluated. Results: Ventricular fibrillation occurred in 11% of patients, and most episodes (94.7%) occurred before or during PCI. Of all patients, 6.3% developed complete atrioventricular block (CAVB), and in 86.3% of these cases, the CAVB occurred before or during PCI; in 94.5%, a CAVB resolution occurred in the catheterization laboratory (CL). Thirty-one patients (4.5%) had impending shock on admission to the CL. Cardiogenic shock developed in 29 patients (4.2%), mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. Only four patients (less than 1%) developed cardiogenic shock later during their hospital course. Similarly, circulatory and ventilatory support, as well as temporary pacing and cardiac defibrillation, were used mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. During the CCU stay, 45 patients (6.5%) had hemorrhagic or vascular complications, and the incidence of post-PCI ischemia and early reocclusion of the culprit vessel were low (2.1% and 0.6%, respectively). Thus, cardiac complications usually associated with AMI were observed mainly before hospital admission or in the CL during the reopening of the target vessel. These complications were rarely observed after a successful PCI. Conclusions: For AMI patients, the CL is not only the site of PCI, it is also where most life-threatening cardiac complications are observed and treated.

KW - Angioplasty

KW - Complications

KW - Myocardial infarction

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