Tissue dose, DNA adducts, oxidative DNA damage and CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in mussels exposed to waterborne benzo[a]pyrene

S. Canova, P. Degan, L. D. Peters, D. R. Livingstone, R. Voltan, P. Venier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A collaborative study was performed on Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) exposed to a wide dose-range (0.5-1000 ppb) of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). We selected this model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in order to confirm the formation of a specific DNA adduct, previously detected in gill DNA, and to clarify the in vivo effects of this mutagenic chemical requiring host-metabolism in mussels. B[a]P concentration reached consistently higher values in the digestive gland than in other analyzed tissues of mussels exposed to B[a]P for 2 or 3 days. With the exception of some values at 1000 ppb of B[a]P, DNA adduct levels increased significantly with the dose in gills and digestive gland and ranged from 0.054 to 0.789 adducts per 108 nucleotides (mean values per dose-point). Conversely, more complex doss-response relationships were found by detecting in parallel the levels of an oxidative DNA lesion (8-OHdG) and of CYP1A-immunopositive proteins (the latter measured in the digestive gland only). Overall, the formation of DNA adducts, the evidence of oxidative DNA damage, and changes in CYP1A-immunopositive protein levels support the hypothesis that B[a]P can induce DNA damage in mussels through a number of different molecular mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-30
Number of pages14
JournalMutation Research - Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis
Volume399
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 13 1998

Keywords

  • 8-OHdG
  • Benzo[a]pyrene
  • CYP1A-immunopositive protein
  • DNA adducts
  • Mytilus galloprovincialis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Molecular Biology

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