Tissue engineering for damaged surface and lining epithelia: Stem cells, current clinical applications, and available engineered tissues

Liliana Guerra, Elena Dellambra, Laura Panacchia, Emanuel Paionni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tissue engineering is an important tool for the treatment of damaged surface and lining epithelia. A source of cells and biocompatible substrates upon which cells can grow and differentiate are key components of this technology. Cultured normal human epithelial cells reconstitute sheets of stratified epithelia that retain biochemical and histological characteristics as well as specific differentiation features of the original donor site. Maintenance of epithelial stem cells in culture and a well-prepared receiving wound bed allow to permanently regenerate full-thickness wounds by means of in vitro reconstituted epithelia. Further, cultured cells produce growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) components that help resident cells to contribute to the wound-healing process. Biological matrices enhance the performance of the in vitro reconstituted epithelia. Owing to their similarity to the ECM, natural polymers offer the advantage of being similar to macromolecules that the human environment is prepared to recognize. They also maintain biological information and physical and chemical features that are instructive for cells used to populate them. This article discusses the developments of tissues engineered for cutaneous and mucosal regeneration. Native tissues and their stem cells are also considered, to enhance understanding of the extensive field of tissue reconstruction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-112
Number of pages22
JournalTissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2009

Fingerprint

Tissue Engineering
Stem cells
Linings
Tissue engineering
Stem Cells
Epithelium
Tissue
Natural polymers
Extracellular Matrix
Epithelial Cells
Cell growth
Macromolecules
Cell culture
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Wounds and Injuries
Wound Healing
Regeneration
Cultured Cells
Polymers
Cell Culture Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

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