Tissue transglutaminase expression in quail epiphyseal chondrocytes

Massimo Sanchez, Antonietta Arcella, Gianfranco Pontarelli, Simona Tavassi, Vittorio Gentile, Anna Cozzolino, Raffaele Porta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tissue transglutaminase (tTGase) is a GTP-binding Ca2+-dependent enzyme which catalyses the post-translational modification via ε(γ-glutamyl)lysine bridges. The physiological role of tTGase is not fully understood. It has been shown that in cartilage the expression of tTGase correlates with terminal differentiation of chondrocytes. Recent evidence suggests that the GTP-binding activity of tTGase may play a role in the control of cell cycle progression thus explaining some of the suggested roles for the enzyme. tTGase activity is present in primary cultures of epiphyseal chondrocytes and increases transiently upon retinoic acid (RA) treatment. Increase in enzyme activity occurs upon RA addition and is accompanied by a parallel increase in protein and mRNA levels. Stimulation of tTGase expression by RA correlates with suppression of cell growth and occurs independently of cell adhesion and cell differentiation. tTGase expression is not observed in MC2, a permanent chondrocyte cell line derived from retrovirus infected chondrocytes. RA treatment fails to activate tTGase expression in MC2 cells and to completely suppress cell proliferation. Our findings lend support to the idea that tTGase might play a role in non-dividing cultured chondrocytes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-49
Number of pages9
JournalCell Biology International
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1999

Fingerprint

Quail
Chondrocytes
Tretinoin
Guanosine Triphosphate
Enzymes
transglutaminase 2
Retroviridae
Post Translational Protein Processing
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Cell Adhesion
Lysine
Cartilage
Cell Differentiation
Cell Proliferation
Cell Line
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Cell adhesion
  • Cell growth
  • Chondrocyte phenotype
  • Retinoic acid
  • Tissue transglutaminase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Sanchez, M., Arcella, A., Pontarelli, G., Tavassi, S., Gentile, V., Cozzolino, A., & Porta, R. (1999). Tissue transglutaminase expression in quail epiphyseal chondrocytes. Cell Biology International, 23(1), 41-49. https://doi.org/10.1006/cbir.1998.0316

Tissue transglutaminase expression in quail epiphyseal chondrocytes. / Sanchez, Massimo; Arcella, Antonietta; Pontarelli, Gianfranco; Tavassi, Simona; Gentile, Vittorio; Cozzolino, Anna; Porta, Raffaele.

In: Cell Biology International, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.1999, p. 41-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanchez, M, Arcella, A, Pontarelli, G, Tavassi, S, Gentile, V, Cozzolino, A & Porta, R 1999, 'Tissue transglutaminase expression in quail epiphyseal chondrocytes', Cell Biology International, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 41-49. https://doi.org/10.1006/cbir.1998.0316
Sanchez, Massimo ; Arcella, Antonietta ; Pontarelli, Gianfranco ; Tavassi, Simona ; Gentile, Vittorio ; Cozzolino, Anna ; Porta, Raffaele. / Tissue transglutaminase expression in quail epiphyseal chondrocytes. In: Cell Biology International. 1999 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 41-49.
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