TMS-induced cortical potentiation during wakefulness locally increases slow wave activity during sleep

Reto Huber, Steve K. Esser, Fabio Ferrarelli, Marcello Massimini, Michael J. Peterson, Giulio Tononi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Sleep slow wave activity (SWA) is thought to reflect sleep need, increasing in proportion to the length of prior wakefulness and decreasing during sleep. However, the process responsible for SWA regulation is not known. We showed recently that SWA increases locally after a learning task involving a circumscribed brain region, suggesting that SWA may reflect plastic changes triggered by learning. Methodology/Principal Findings. To test this hypothesis directly, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in conjunction with high-density EEG in humans. We show that 5-Hz TMS applied to motor cortex induces a localized potentiation of TMS-evoked cortical EEG responses. We then show that, in the sleep episode following 5-Hz TMS, SWA increases markedly (+39.1±17.4%, p

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere276
JournalPLoS One
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 7 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'TMS-induced cortical potentiation during wakefulness locally increases slow wave activity during sleep'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this