To feed or not to feed? Case presentation and best practice guidance for human milk feeding and group B streptococcus in developed countries

Riccardo Davanzo, Angela De Cunto, Laura Travan, Gianfranco Bacolla, Roberta Creti, Sergio Demarini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the most frequent cause of neonatal invasive disease. Two forms of GBS are recognized: early-onset and late-onset disease. The average incidence of late-onset disease is 0.24 per 1000, a figure that has remained substantially unchanged over time. Exposure to breast milk represents a potential source of infection, especially in late-onset and/or recurrent GBS disease. As a result, both breastfeeding and the use of breast milk have been questioned. We report for the first time the case of both simultaneous and recurrent infection in newborn preterm twins, born 3 weeks apart, resulting from ingestion of GBS positive breast milk. A genetically identical strain was found in both breast milk and her newborn infants. Transmission of GBS through breast milk should be considered in late-onset GBS sepsis. An eradicating antibiotic treatment of GBS positive mothers with ampicillin plus rifampin and temporary discontinuation of breastfeeding and/or the use of heat processed breast milk may represent preventive measures, although outcomes are inconsistent, for recurrent GBS disease. Guidelines on breastfeeding and prevention of recurrent neonatal GBS disease are needed. It is unfortunate that existing scientific literature is scarce and there is no general consensus. As a consequence, we propose a best practice approach on the topic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)452-457
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

Streptococcus agalactiae
Human Milk
Practice Guidelines
Developed Countries
Breast Feeding
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Newborn Infant
Literature
Ampicillin
Rifampin
Infection
Sepsis
Consensus
Eating
Hot Temperature
Mothers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Guidelines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Incidence

Keywords

  • best practices
  • breast milk
  • breastfeeding
  • group B Streptococcus disease
  • twins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

To feed or not to feed? Case presentation and best practice guidance for human milk feeding and group B streptococcus in developed countries. / Davanzo, Riccardo; De Cunto, Angela; Travan, Laura; Bacolla, Gianfranco; Creti, Roberta; Demarini, Sergio.

In: Journal of Human Lactation, Vol. 29, No. 4, 11.2013, p. 452-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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