Total repair of pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect and major aortopulmonary collaterals

An integrated approach

A. Carotti, R. M. Di Donato, C. Squitieri, P. Guccione, G. Catena, A. R. Castaneda, M. Reddy, C. I. Tchervenkov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Predicting postrepair right ventricular/left ventricular pressure ratio has prognostic relevance for patients undergoing total repair of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and major aortopulmonary collateral arteries. To this purpose, we currently rely on 2 novel parameters: (1) preoperative total neopulmonary arterial index and (2) mean pulmonary artery pressure changes during an intraoperative flow study. Methods: Since January 1994, 15 consecutive patients (aged 64 ± 54 months) with pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and major aortopulmonary collaterals were managed according to total neopulmonary arterial index. Seven patients with hypoplastic pulmonary arteries and a total neopulmonary arterial index less than 150 mm2/m2 underwent palliative right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction followed by secondary 1-stage unifocalization and ventricular septal defect closure. The other 8 patients with a preoperative index of more than 150 mm2/m2 underwent primary single-stage unifocalization and repair. The ventricular septal defect was closed in all cases (reopened in 1). In 9, such decision was based on an intraoperative flow study. Results: Patients treated by right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction had a significant increase of pulmonary artery index (P = .006) within 22 ± 6 months. Repair was successful in 14 cases (postrepair right ventricular/left ventricular pressure ratio = 0.47 ± 0.1). One hospital death occurred as a result of pulmonary vascular obstructive disease, despite a reassuring intraoperative flow study. Accuracy of this test in predicting the postrepair mean pulmonary artery pressure was 89% (95% CI: 51%-99%). At follow-up (18 ± 12 months), all patients are free of symptoms, requiring no medications. Conclusion: The integrated approach to total repair of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and major aortopulmonary collaterals by preoperative calculation of total neopulmonary arterial index, right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction (when required), and intraoperative flow study may lead to optimal intermediate results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)914-923
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume116
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1998

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Ventricular Heart Septal Defects
Pulmonary Artery
Pulmonary Atresia
Ventricular Pressure
Pressure
Patient Rights
Vascular Diseases
Arteries
Pulmonary Atresia With Ventricular Septal Defect
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Total repair of pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect and major aortopulmonary collaterals : An integrated approach. / Carotti, A.; Di Donato, R. M.; Squitieri, C.; Guccione, P.; Catena, G.; Castaneda, A. R.; Reddy, M.; Tchervenkov, C. I.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 116, No. 6, 1998, p. 914-923.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carotti, A. ; Di Donato, R. M. ; Squitieri, C. ; Guccione, P. ; Catena, G. ; Castaneda, A. R. ; Reddy, M. ; Tchervenkov, C. I. / Total repair of pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect and major aortopulmonary collaterals : An integrated approach. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 116, No. 6. pp. 914-923.
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abstract = "Background: Predicting postrepair right ventricular/left ventricular pressure ratio has prognostic relevance for patients undergoing total repair of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and major aortopulmonary collateral arteries. To this purpose, we currently rely on 2 novel parameters: (1) preoperative total neopulmonary arterial index and (2) mean pulmonary artery pressure changes during an intraoperative flow study. Methods: Since January 1994, 15 consecutive patients (aged 64 ± 54 months) with pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and major aortopulmonary collaterals were managed according to total neopulmonary arterial index. Seven patients with hypoplastic pulmonary arteries and a total neopulmonary arterial index less than 150 mm2/m2 underwent palliative right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction followed by secondary 1-stage unifocalization and ventricular septal defect closure. The other 8 patients with a preoperative index of more than 150 mm2/m2 underwent primary single-stage unifocalization and repair. The ventricular septal defect was closed in all cases (reopened in 1). In 9, such decision was based on an intraoperative flow study. Results: Patients treated by right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction had a significant increase of pulmonary artery index (P = .006) within 22 ± 6 months. Repair was successful in 14 cases (postrepair right ventricular/left ventricular pressure ratio = 0.47 ± 0.1). One hospital death occurred as a result of pulmonary vascular obstructive disease, despite a reassuring intraoperative flow study. Accuracy of this test in predicting the postrepair mean pulmonary artery pressure was 89{\%} (95{\%} CI: 51{\%}-99{\%}). At follow-up (18 ± 12 months), all patients are free of symptoms, requiring no medications. Conclusion: The integrated approach to total repair of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and major aortopulmonary collaterals by preoperative calculation of total neopulmonary arterial index, right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction (when required), and intraoperative flow study may lead to optimal intermediate results.",
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