Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of elemental mercury following self-administration

Giuseppe De Palma, Orietta Mariotti, Davide Lonati, Matteo Goldoni, Simona Catalani, Antonio Mutti, Carlo Locatelli, Pietro Apostoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. Intravenous injection of mercury has seldom been reported, especially in cases of attempted suicide, and is associated with variable clinical outcomes. Case report. A young woman came to our attention after self-injecting and ingesting mercury drawn from 37 thermometers. The patient suffered lung embolization complicated by adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), toxic dermatitis, anemia, mild hepato-renal impairment, and died after 30 days. Mercury was monitored in biological fluids (blood, plasma, urine, and bronchoalveolar fluid) to study its toxicokinetics and to evaluate dose-effect relationships. Its urinary clearance significantly increased after a chelation challenge test with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) (median values of 2.48 and 8.85 before and after the test, respectively, p <0.05). Conclusions. Mercury poisoning by intravenous injection is a clinical emergency, potentially leading to death. When injected, the element has a very slow clearance, mainly renal. Our data do not allow any conclusion about the effectiveness of chelation therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)869-876
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Toxicology
Volume46
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint

Self Administration
Mercury
Chelation
Intravenous Injections
Mercury Poisoning
Dermatitis
Chelation Therapy
Succimer
Kidney
Thermometers
Attempted Suicide
Fluids
Poisons
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Anemia
Emergencies
Blood
Urine
Plasmas
Lung

Keywords

  • Embolism
  • Intravenous
  • Mercury
  • Poisoning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

De Palma, G., Mariotti, O., Lonati, D., Goldoni, M., Catalani, S., Mutti, A., ... Apostoli, P. (2008). Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of elemental mercury following self-administration. Clinical Toxicology, 46(9), 869-876. https://doi.org/10.1080/15563650802136241

Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of elemental mercury following self-administration. / De Palma, Giuseppe; Mariotti, Orietta; Lonati, Davide; Goldoni, Matteo; Catalani, Simona; Mutti, Antonio; Locatelli, Carlo; Apostoli, Pietro.

In: Clinical Toxicology, Vol. 46, No. 9, 11.2008, p. 869-876.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Palma, G, Mariotti, O, Lonati, D, Goldoni, M, Catalani, S, Mutti, A, Locatelli, C & Apostoli, P 2008, 'Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of elemental mercury following self-administration', Clinical Toxicology, vol. 46, no. 9, pp. 869-876. https://doi.org/10.1080/15563650802136241
De Palma, Giuseppe ; Mariotti, Orietta ; Lonati, Davide ; Goldoni, Matteo ; Catalani, Simona ; Mutti, Antonio ; Locatelli, Carlo ; Apostoli, Pietro. / Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of elemental mercury following self-administration. In: Clinical Toxicology. 2008 ; Vol. 46, No. 9. pp. 869-876.
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