TP53 codon 72 polymorphism in classic, endemic and epidemic kaposi's sarcoma in African and caucasian patients

Maria Lina Tornesello, Bennon Biryahwaho, Robert Downing, Angelo Hatzakis, Elvio Alessi, Marco Cusini, Vincenzo Ruocco, Edward Katongole-Mbidde, Luigi Buonaguro, Franco M. Buonaguro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Several studies have examined the association of codon 72 polymorphism of the TP53 gene, encoding either arginine or proline, in several tumor types but none have investigated its role in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) development. Methods: In this prevalent case-control study, 67 cutaneous lesions of classic, iatrogenic, endemic as well as epidemic KS from African (n = 22) and Caucasian (n = 45) patients, and blood samples from 150 healthy controls (n = 57 African, n = 93 Caucasian) have been analyzed for arginine and proline allele distribution. Results: Among African cases the proline homozygous, heterozygous and arginine homozygous genotype frequencies were 50.0, 31.8 and 18.2%, respectively, and among controls 54.4, 40.3, and 5.3%, respectively (p = 0.1872). Conversely, among Caucasian cases genotype distributions were 6.7, 55.6, and 37.8%, and among controls 7.5, 34.4, and 58.1%, respectively (p = 0.0567). No significant differences in arginine and proline allele distribution were observed when the cases were stratified by HIV status/tumor type. Conclusions: The results obtained in this study suggest that p53 polymorphism at codon 72 does not represent a risk factor for the development of all forms of KS, either among African or among Caucasian populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-334
Number of pages7
JournalOncology
Volume77
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009

Keywords

  • Cancer risk
  • Genetic susceptibility
  • Kaposi's sarcoma
  • TP53 polymorphism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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