Training practices of hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis and -cord blood collection staff: Analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonisation of Cellular Therapy Accreditation

Christina M. Celluzzi, Carolyn Keever-Taylor, Mahmoud Alurf, Mickey B C Koh, Fran Rabe, Paolo Rebulla, Nicoletta Sacchi, Jean Sanders, Eoin McGrath, Kathy Loper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background As hematopoietic stem cell transplantation expands globally, identification of the key elements that make up high-quality training programs will become more important to optimizing collection practices and quality of the products collected.

Study Design and Methods Multiple-choice and open questions to identify training practices of those collecting hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis [HPC(A)] and -cord blood [HPC(CB)] products were distributed via an electronic survey tool worldwide. Data were collected on facility demographics, job descriptions, and the content of training programs including general practices, staff assessment, retraining, and unique program features.

Results Respondents from more than 50 countries predominantly associating with facilities in North America and Europe represented transplant centers or transfusion services also performing collections. For the majority of staff performing HPC(A) collections (50%), initial training required as many procedures as necessary be done until competency was achieved. Competency was evaluated by direct observation comparing performance to written procedures or protocol steps (47%), combination of written assessment and observation (45%), evaluation of product quality (40%), and written assessment alone (12%). Staff retraining was customized on a case-by-case basis (42%). Similar criteria were placed on HPC(CB) training, with an emphasis on product quality measured by sterility, CD34+ cell collection efficiency, hematocrit, volume, and mononuclear cell count.

Conclusion Observation, practice, evaluation, and retraining until competency is achieved marked the training programs. Success was based on the ability of staff to execute procedures ultimately measured in product quality. Identified features may assist facilities in further developing and strengthening their own training programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3138-3144
Number of pages7
JournalTransfusion
Volume54
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

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