Transcription of latent and replicative Epstein-Barr-virus genes in bone-marrow and peripheral-blood mononuclear cells of health donors

Roberta Gonnella, Antonio Angeloni, Antonella Calocero, Antonella Farina, Roberta Santarelli, Giuseppe Gentile, William Arcese, Pietro Martino, Franco Mandelli, Luigi Frati, Alberto Faggioni, Giuseppe Ragona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction has been used to analyze the expression of 2 latent genes (EBNA-1 and LMP-1) and one replicative gene (BZLF-1) of Epstein-Barr virus in mononuclear cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood of healthy donors. EBV-gene transcription was detected in 8 out of 15 bone-marrow samples. Among these, 5 allowed the detection of latency-associated transcripts in the absence of BZLF-1 expression. Only one sample showed positivity for expression of both latent and lytic genes. In 2 cases, BZLF-1 was the only transcript detected. In peripheral blood, 4 out of 7 samples showed evidence of EBNA-1 transcription; LMP-1 was expressed in 5 samples, and in 2 cases concomitant expression of EBNA-1 and BZLF-1 was detected. These results provide a direct demonstration by RT-PCR of EBV-gene transcription in bone-marrow-resident viral infected cells and suggest, in contrast to previous studies on peripheral blood, that LMP-1 and BZLF-1 are frequently transcribed also in absence of EBV-related disease. The heterogeneous viral gene expression found makes it difficult to define a pattern of viral latency in vivo which coincides with that described for lymphoblastoid or Burkitt's-lymphoma cell lines at different stages of differentiation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)524-529
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume70
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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