Transduced fibroblasts and metachromatic leukodystrophy lymphocytes transfer arylsulfatase A to myelinating glia and deficient cells in vitro

Antonella Sangalli, Carla Taveggia, Alessandro Salviati, Lawrence Wrabetz, Claudio Bordignon, Giovanni M. Severini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA), that manifests primarily in the white matter of the nervous system. Currently, no specific treatment exists that will reverse its fatal outcome. Replacement therapy has been hampered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To circumvent this problem we designed an ex vivo gene therapy strategy that includes the retrovirus-mediated ASA transduction of cells, such as activated lymphocytes, that are able to traverse the BBB or other membranes of the CNS. For this purpose, two recombinant retroviruses based on the pLXSN vector were produced, containing the wild-type ASA cDNA or a pseudodeficiency ASA cDNA, which encodes a smaller enzyme with normal activity. After transduction, ASA activity increased more than 100-fold in fibroblasts from an MLD patient. Furthermore, ASA-transduced MLD PBLs expressed 30 times higher ASA activity when compared with control PBLs. Moreover, cell culture experiments demonstrated that transduced fibroblasts could efficiently transfer ASA to deficient cells across a transwell barrier, whereas transduced MLD lymphocytes could transfer ASA to deficient fibroblasts only by direct cell-to-cell contact. Finally, ASA was taken up by normal oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, the target myelinating glial cells for therapy in MLD. These data suggest possible short-term strategies for transfer of ASA into the CNS via transduced autologous cells while long-term strategies, related to autologous transduced bone marrow transplant, take effect in patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2111-2119
Number of pages9
JournalHuman Gene Therapy
Volume9
Issue number14
Publication statusPublished - Sep 20 1998

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Cerebroside-Sulfatase
Metachromatic Leukodystrophy
Neuroglia
Fibroblasts
Lymphocytes
Retroviridae
Blood-Brain Barrier
Complementary DNA
In Vitro Techniques
Lysosomal Storage Diseases
Fatal Outcome
Schwann Cells
Oligodendroglia
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Genetic Therapy
Nervous System
Cell Culture Techniques
Bone Marrow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

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Transduced fibroblasts and metachromatic leukodystrophy lymphocytes transfer arylsulfatase A to myelinating glia and deficient cells in vitro. / Sangalli, Antonella; Taveggia, Carla; Salviati, Alessandro; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Bordignon, Claudio; Severini, Giovanni M.

In: Human Gene Therapy, Vol. 9, No. 14, 20.09.1998, p. 2111-2119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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