Transient chorea in a patient with type 1 diabetes may induce a reduction in insulin demand through increased spontaneous movements

F. Cadario, G. Moreno, S. Esposito, C. Peruzzi, G. Bona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The importance of physical activity in the management of diabetes is well established. The effect of programmed exercise and measurable skeletal activities on diabetes has been variously studied. Chorea induces an increase in spontaneous movement. Its occurrence in a teenager with type 1 diabetes provides new insights into our knowledge of metabolic outcomes. In our patient, the reduction in dairy insulin demand was linked to choreic movement: a 67% decrease in insulin supply was needed to avoid episodes of hypoglycaemia; moreover, improved metabolism (measured as glycated haemoglobin) was obtained. Since no dietary changes were made and clinical events (including fever, drugs, weight loss, voluntary physical activity, psychological opposition or refusal of treatment) interfering with metabolic control of diabetes occurred, it appeared that only increased physical movements due to chorea reduced the patient's insulin requirement. As spontaneous movements declined with healing, metabolic control was lost, requiring an increase in insulin dosage to restore it. This article sheds additional light on our current understanding of hypoglycaemia and the variability of exogenous insulin demand in childhood and adolescent diabetes, when there are spontaneous movements and play. This finding highlights the importance of movement in type 1 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-52
Number of pages4
JournalMinerva Pediatrica
Volume59
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

Fingerprint

Chorea
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin
Exercise
Hypoglycemia
Treatment Refusal
Anti-Obesity Agents
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Fever
Psychology

Keywords

  • Blood glucose
  • Chorea
  • Diabetes mellitus, type 1
  • Exercises
  • Metabolism
  • Physical fitness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Transient chorea in a patient with type 1 diabetes may induce a reduction in insulin demand through increased spontaneous movements. / Cadario, F.; Moreno, G.; Esposito, S.; Peruzzi, C.; Bona, G.

In: Minerva Pediatrica, Vol. 59, No. 1, 02.2007, p. 49-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cadario, F. ; Moreno, G. ; Esposito, S. ; Peruzzi, C. ; Bona, G. / Transient chorea in a patient with type 1 diabetes may induce a reduction in insulin demand through increased spontaneous movements. In: Minerva Pediatrica. 2007 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 49-52.
@article{57fbb4657f7846e0b948d7b0bbf6b6c1,
title = "Transient chorea in a patient with type 1 diabetes may induce a reduction in insulin demand through increased spontaneous movements",
abstract = "The importance of physical activity in the management of diabetes is well established. The effect of programmed exercise and measurable skeletal activities on diabetes has been variously studied. Chorea induces an increase in spontaneous movement. Its occurrence in a teenager with type 1 diabetes provides new insights into our knowledge of metabolic outcomes. In our patient, the reduction in dairy insulin demand was linked to choreic movement: a 67{\%} decrease in insulin supply was needed to avoid episodes of hypoglycaemia; moreover, improved metabolism (measured as glycated haemoglobin) was obtained. Since no dietary changes were made and clinical events (including fever, drugs, weight loss, voluntary physical activity, psychological opposition or refusal of treatment) interfering with metabolic control of diabetes occurred, it appeared that only increased physical movements due to chorea reduced the patient's insulin requirement. As spontaneous movements declined with healing, metabolic control was lost, requiring an increase in insulin dosage to restore it. This article sheds additional light on our current understanding of hypoglycaemia and the variability of exogenous insulin demand in childhood and adolescent diabetes, when there are spontaneous movements and play. This finding highlights the importance of movement in type 1 diabetes.",
keywords = "Blood glucose, Chorea, Diabetes mellitus, type 1, Exercises, Metabolism, Physical fitness",
author = "F. Cadario and G. Moreno and S. Esposito and C. Peruzzi and G. Bona",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "49--52",
journal = "Minerva Pediatrica",
issn = "0026-4946",
publisher = "Edizioni Minerva Medica S.p.A.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transient chorea in a patient with type 1 diabetes may induce a reduction in insulin demand through increased spontaneous movements

AU - Cadario, F.

AU - Moreno, G.

AU - Esposito, S.

AU - Peruzzi, C.

AU - Bona, G.

PY - 2007/2

Y1 - 2007/2

N2 - The importance of physical activity in the management of diabetes is well established. The effect of programmed exercise and measurable skeletal activities on diabetes has been variously studied. Chorea induces an increase in spontaneous movement. Its occurrence in a teenager with type 1 diabetes provides new insights into our knowledge of metabolic outcomes. In our patient, the reduction in dairy insulin demand was linked to choreic movement: a 67% decrease in insulin supply was needed to avoid episodes of hypoglycaemia; moreover, improved metabolism (measured as glycated haemoglobin) was obtained. Since no dietary changes were made and clinical events (including fever, drugs, weight loss, voluntary physical activity, psychological opposition or refusal of treatment) interfering with metabolic control of diabetes occurred, it appeared that only increased physical movements due to chorea reduced the patient's insulin requirement. As spontaneous movements declined with healing, metabolic control was lost, requiring an increase in insulin dosage to restore it. This article sheds additional light on our current understanding of hypoglycaemia and the variability of exogenous insulin demand in childhood and adolescent diabetes, when there are spontaneous movements and play. This finding highlights the importance of movement in type 1 diabetes.

AB - The importance of physical activity in the management of diabetes is well established. The effect of programmed exercise and measurable skeletal activities on diabetes has been variously studied. Chorea induces an increase in spontaneous movement. Its occurrence in a teenager with type 1 diabetes provides new insights into our knowledge of metabolic outcomes. In our patient, the reduction in dairy insulin demand was linked to choreic movement: a 67% decrease in insulin supply was needed to avoid episodes of hypoglycaemia; moreover, improved metabolism (measured as glycated haemoglobin) was obtained. Since no dietary changes were made and clinical events (including fever, drugs, weight loss, voluntary physical activity, psychological opposition or refusal of treatment) interfering with metabolic control of diabetes occurred, it appeared that only increased physical movements due to chorea reduced the patient's insulin requirement. As spontaneous movements declined with healing, metabolic control was lost, requiring an increase in insulin dosage to restore it. This article sheds additional light on our current understanding of hypoglycaemia and the variability of exogenous insulin demand in childhood and adolescent diabetes, when there are spontaneous movements and play. This finding highlights the importance of movement in type 1 diabetes.

KW - Blood glucose

KW - Chorea

KW - Diabetes mellitus, type 1

KW - Exercises

KW - Metabolism

KW - Physical fitness

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34247523258&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34247523258&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 17301725

AN - SCOPUS:34247523258

VL - 59

SP - 49

EP - 52

JO - Minerva Pediatrica

JF - Minerva Pediatrica

SN - 0026-4946

IS - 1

ER -