Treatment of 'cimetidine-resistant' chronic duodenal ulcers with ranitidine or cimetidine: A randomised multicenter study

M. Quatrini, G. Basilisco, P. A. Bianchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forty patients with endoscopically proven persistent duodenal ulcer who had been treated for six weeks with cimetidine (1 g/day) were randomly allocated to receive a further six weeks' treatment with cimetidine (1 g/day) or ranitidine (300 mg/day). Ulcers healed in 12 of 19 patients given cimetidine (63%) and in 12 of 21 given ranitidine (62%); two patients on cimetidine and two on ranitidine dropped out. In the unhealed ulcer group the ulcer size was reduced in most patients. There was no change in basal acid output, peak acid output, plasma gastrin and pepsinogen I levels after either treatment. Clinical data, gastric function tests, and endoscopic features did not predict ulcer healing. Both treatments were effective in the relief of pain: 72% of patients with unhealed ulcers were asymptomatic at the end of the trial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1113-1117
Number of pages5
JournalGut
Volume25
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 1984

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Ranitidine
Cimetidine
Duodenal Ulcer
Multicenter Studies
Ulcer
Pepsinogen A
Therapeutics
Acids
Stomach
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Treatment of 'cimetidine-resistant' chronic duodenal ulcers with ranitidine or cimetidine : A randomised multicenter study. / Quatrini, M.; Basilisco, G.; Bianchi, P. A.

In: Gut, Vol. 25, No. 10, 1984, p. 1113-1117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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