Treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) is a purely motor multineuropathy characterized by multifocal conduction blocks on motor nerves. The pathogenesis of MMN is not known but its frequent association with anti-ganglioside antibodies and the improvement after immune therapies support an immune pathogenesis. Patients with MMN do not respond to steroids or plasma exchange, which may occasionally even worsen the symptoms, while the efficacy of other immune suppressive therapies is controversial. More than 80% of MMN patients rapidly and consistently improve with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), the efficacy of which has been confirmed in four controlled studies. In most patients, however, the effects of this therapy only last a few weeks and improvement has to be maintained with periodic infusions for long periods of time, if not indefinitely.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeurological Sciences
Volume24
Issue numberSUPPL. 4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2003

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Plasma Exchange
Gangliosides
Intravenous Immunoglobulins
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Therapeutics
Steroids

Keywords

  • Conduction block
  • Gangliosides
  • IVIg therapy
  • Neuropathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy. / Nobile-Orazio, E.; Terenghi, F.; Carpo, M.; Bersano, A.

In: Neurological Sciences, Vol. 24, No. SUPPL. 4, 10.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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