Treatment with K6PC-5, a selective stimulator of SPHK1, ameliorates intestinal homeostasis in an animal model of Huntington's disease

A Di Pardo, G Pepe, L Capocci, F Marracino, E Amico, L Del Vecchio, S Giova, S K Jeong, B M Park, B D Park, V Maglione

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

9 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Emerging evidence indicates that Huntington's disease (HD) may be described as multi-organ pathology. In this context, we and others have contributed to demonstrate that the disease is characterized by an impairment of the homeostasis of gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Sphingolipids represent a class of molecules involved in the regulation and maintenance of different tissues and organs including GI system. In this study, we investigated whether the alteration of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism, previously described in human HD brains and animal models, is also detectable peripherally R6/2 HD mice. Our findings indicate for the first time, that sphingolipid metabolism is perturbed early in the disease in the intestinal tract of HD mice and, its modulation by K6PC-5, a selective activator of S1P synthesis, preserved intestinal integrity and homeostasis. These results further support the evidence that modulation of sphingolipid pathways may represent a potential therapeutic option in HD and suggest that it has also the potential to counteract the peripheral disturbances which may usually complicate the management of the disease and affect patient's quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105009
JournalNeurobiology of Disease
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Jul 4 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Treatment with K6PC-5, a selective stimulator of SPHK1, ameliorates intestinal homeostasis in an animal model of Huntington's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this