Tumor BRCA test for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: The role of molecular pathology in the era of PARP inhibitor therapy

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Abstract

The PARP inhibitor olaparib has been approved in the maintenance setting of platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer patients with germline or somatic BRCA1/2 mutation. Therefore, the availability of a tumor BRCA test has become a clinical need. We report the results of the clinical implementation of a tumor BRCA test within the frame of an institutional workflow for the management of patients with nonmucinous and nonborderline epithelial ovarian cancer. In total, 223 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were prospectively analyzed. BRCA1/2 status was evaluated on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens using next-generation sequencing technology. The tumor BRCA test had a success rate of 99.1% (221 of 223 successfully analyzed cases) and a median turnaround time of 17 calendar days. Among the 221 cases, BRCA1 or BRCA2 pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations were found in 62 (28.1%) cases and variants of uncertain significance in 25 (11.3%) cases. The concordance rate between tumor BRCA test results and germline BRCA1/2 status was 87%, with five cases harboring pathogenic/likely pathogenic somatic-only mutations. The next-generation, sequencing-based tumor BRCA test showed a high success rate and a turnaround time compatible with clinical purposes. The tumor BRCA test could be implemented in a molecular diagnostic setting and it may guide the clinical management of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1641
JournalCancers
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

Keywords

  • BRCA1/2
  • Next-generation sequencing
  • Ovarian cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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