Two amino acid substitutions within the first external loop of CCR5 induce human immunodeficiency virus-blocking antibodies in mice and chickens

Claudia Pastori, Alberto Clivio, Lorenzo Diomede, Roberto Consonni, G. M S De Mori, Renato Longhi, Giorgio Colombo, Lucia Lopalco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Antibodies to the first loop (ECL1) of CCR5 have been identified in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-exposed uninfected individuals (ESN) and in HIV-positive nonprogressing subjects. Thus, these antibodies may confer resistance against HIV infection. To define which amino acids are involved in antibody binding to CCR5, we performed a peptide-scanning assay and studied the immunogenicity of peptides in animal models. A panel of synthetic peptides spanning the CCR5-ECL1 region and displaying glycine or alanine substitutions was assayed for antibody binding with a pool of natural anti-CCR5 antibodies. We used mice and chickens to study the immunogenicity of mutagenized peptide. Structural characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the structural and conformational features of the mutagenized peptide. Amino acid substitutions in positions Ala95 and Ala96 (A95-A96) increased antibody-peptide binding compared to that of the wild-type peptide (Asp95-Phe96). The Ala95-96 peptide was shown to induce, in mice and chickens, antibodies displaying biological activity at very low concentrations. Strikingly, chicken antibodies to the Ala95-96 peptide specifically recognize human CCR5 molecules, downregulate receptors from lymphocytes, inhibit CCR5-dependent chemotaxis, and prevent infection by several R5 viruses, displaying 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 3 ng/ml. NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations proved the high flexibility of isolated epitopes and suggested that A95-A96 substitutions determine a slightly higher tendency to generate helical conformations combined with a lower steric hindrance of the side chains in the peptides. These findings may be relevant to the induction of strong and efficient HIV-blocking antibodies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4125-4134
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume82
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Blocking Antibodies
Human immunodeficiency virus
amino acid substitution
Amino Acid Substitution
Chickens
HIV
peptides
chickens
Peptides
antibodies
mice
Antibodies
molecular dynamics
Molecular Dynamics Simulation
nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
immune response
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
synthetic peptides
chemotaxis
HIV infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Two amino acid substitutions within the first external loop of CCR5 induce human immunodeficiency virus-blocking antibodies in mice and chickens. / Pastori, Claudia; Clivio, Alberto; Diomede, Lorenzo; Consonni, Roberto; De Mori, G. M S; Longhi, Renato; Colombo, Giorgio; Lopalco, Lucia.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 82, No. 8, 04.2008, p. 4125-4134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pastori, Claudia ; Clivio, Alberto ; Diomede, Lorenzo ; Consonni, Roberto ; De Mori, G. M S ; Longhi, Renato ; Colombo, Giorgio ; Lopalco, Lucia. / Two amino acid substitutions within the first external loop of CCR5 induce human immunodeficiency virus-blocking antibodies in mice and chickens. In: Journal of Virology. 2008 ; Vol. 82, No. 8. pp. 4125-4134.
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