Ultra-low-dose CT with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR): detection of ground-glass nodules in an anthropomorphic phantom study

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Abstract

Purpose: The authors sought to evaluate the effect of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) on the sensitivity of ground-glass nodule (GGN) detection at different dose levels. Materials and methods: Fifty-four artificial GGN were randomly divided into three sets, each positioned in an anthropomorphic phantom. The three sets were evaluated on standard-dose (SD, 350 mA), low-dose (LD, 35 mA) and ultra-low-dose (ULD, 10 mA) CT scans (100 kV, 64 × 0.625 mm, 0.5 s), and each scan was reconstructed twice with filtered back projection (FBP) and MBIR. Three radiologists independently evaluated the scans for GGN presence and size. SD + FBP was considered the reference standard. A region of interest (ROI) was used to calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio normalised to dose (CNRD). McNemar’s test, Bland–Altman analysis and t test were used for statistical assessment (p  0.05). Bland–Altman analysis showed a good reader agreement (±1.5 mm) for GGN size between SD + FBP and ULD + MBIR. For low dose and ultra-low dose, the SNR and CNRD were significantly higher with MBIR (p 

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)611-617
Number of pages7
JournalRadiologia Medica
Volume120
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 17 2015

Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • Ground-glass nodules
  • Iterative reconstruction
  • Radiation exposure dose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Medicine(all)

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