Ultradian ghrelin pulsatility is disrupted in morbidly obese subjects after weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery

Geltrude Mingrone, Luigi Granato, Elena Valera-Mora, Amerigo Iaconelli, Menotti F. Calvani, Roberto Bracaglia, Melania Manco, Giuseppe Nanni, Marco Castagneto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Suppression of ghrelin production after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass that suggested its contribution to appetite reduction has been reported. Objective: Because biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) does not affect appetite, we compared ghrelin production and 24-h pulsatility between healthy control subjects and obese subjects before and after BPD. Design: A computerized algorithm identified peak heights, clearance rate, and peak frequency of ghrelin over 24 h. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was measured in the calorimetric chamber, and energy intakes were computed. Insulin sensitivity was measured with a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Results: Mean (±SD) 24-h plasma ghrelin concentrations were significantly (P <0.0001) higher in control than in obese subjects (338.17 ± 22.09 and 164.47 ± 29.19 μg/L, respectively), but they increased to 204.64 ± 28.51 μg/L in the obese subjects after BPD (P <0.01). The pulsatility index was 0.098 ± 0.016 and 0.041 ± 0.014 μg·L-1·min -1 in control and obese subjects, respectively (P <0.01), and decreased to 0.025 ± 0.007 μg·l-1·min -1 after BPD (P <0.05). Energy intakes before and after BFP did not differ significantly. Although metabolizable energy after BPD was 40% of the energy intake, that (per kg fat-free mass) after BPD did not different significantly from that before BPD. Conclusions: Weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery is associated with greater ghrelin concentrations, which, however, remain consistently lower than those in control subjects, whereas ghrelin pulsatility is subverted. Higher ghrelin concentrationsmaycontribute to the high calorie intakes observed in post-BPD subjects. The lack of normal pulsatility may explain the new impulse of these subjects to eat very frequently.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1017-1024
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume83
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2006

Fingerprint

Biliopancreatic Diversion
bariatric surgery
ghrelin
Ghrelin
Bariatric Surgery
Weight Loss
weight loss
energy intake
Energy Intake
appetite
Appetite
Glucose Clamp Technique
Gastric Bypass
insulin resistance
metabolizable energy
energy expenditure
Energy Metabolism
Insulin Resistance
Healthy Volunteers
Fats

Keywords

  • Appetite
  • Biliopancreatic diversion
  • Energy intake
  • Ghrelin
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Morbid obesity
  • Pulsatility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Mingrone, G., Granato, L., Valera-Mora, E., Iaconelli, A., Calvani, M. F., Bracaglia, R., ... Castagneto, M. (2006). Ultradian ghrelin pulsatility is disrupted in morbidly obese subjects after weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 83(5), 1017-1024.

Ultradian ghrelin pulsatility is disrupted in morbidly obese subjects after weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery. / Mingrone, Geltrude; Granato, Luigi; Valera-Mora, Elena; Iaconelli, Amerigo; Calvani, Menotti F.; Bracaglia, Roberto; Manco, Melania; Nanni, Giuseppe; Castagneto, Marco.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 83, No. 5, 01.05.2006, p. 1017-1024.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mingrone, G, Granato, L, Valera-Mora, E, Iaconelli, A, Calvani, MF, Bracaglia, R, Manco, M, Nanni, G & Castagneto, M 2006, 'Ultradian ghrelin pulsatility is disrupted in morbidly obese subjects after weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 83, no. 5, pp. 1017-1024.
Mingrone G, Granato L, Valera-Mora E, Iaconelli A, Calvani MF, Bracaglia R et al. Ultradian ghrelin pulsatility is disrupted in morbidly obese subjects after weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2006 May 1;83(5):1017-1024.
Mingrone, Geltrude ; Granato, Luigi ; Valera-Mora, Elena ; Iaconelli, Amerigo ; Calvani, Menotti F. ; Bracaglia, Roberto ; Manco, Melania ; Nanni, Giuseppe ; Castagneto, Marco. / Ultradian ghrelin pulsatility is disrupted in morbidly obese subjects after weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2006 ; Vol. 83, No. 5. pp. 1017-1024.
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abstract = "Background: Suppression of ghrelin production after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass that suggested its contribution to appetite reduction has been reported. Objective: Because biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) does not affect appetite, we compared ghrelin production and 24-h pulsatility between healthy control subjects and obese subjects before and after BPD. Design: A computerized algorithm identified peak heights, clearance rate, and peak frequency of ghrelin over 24 h. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was measured in the calorimetric chamber, and energy intakes were computed. Insulin sensitivity was measured with a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Results: Mean (±SD) 24-h plasma ghrelin concentrations were significantly (P <0.0001) higher in control than in obese subjects (338.17 ± 22.09 and 164.47 ± 29.19 μg/L, respectively), but they increased to 204.64 ± 28.51 μg/L in the obese subjects after BPD (P <0.01). The pulsatility index was 0.098 ± 0.016 and 0.041 ± 0.014 μg·L-1·min -1 in control and obese subjects, respectively (P <0.01), and decreased to 0.025 ± 0.007 μg·l-1·min -1 after BPD (P <0.05). Energy intakes before and after BFP did not differ significantly. Although metabolizable energy after BPD was 40{\%} of the energy intake, that (per kg fat-free mass) after BPD did not different significantly from that before BPD. Conclusions: Weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery is associated with greater ghrelin concentrations, which, however, remain consistently lower than those in control subjects, whereas ghrelin pulsatility is subverted. Higher ghrelin concentrationsmaycontribute to the high calorie intakes observed in post-BPD subjects. The lack of normal pulsatility may explain the new impulse of these subjects to eat very frequently.",
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AU - Iaconelli, Amerigo

AU - Calvani, Menotti F.

AU - Bracaglia, Roberto

AU - Manco, Melania

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N2 - Background: Suppression of ghrelin production after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass that suggested its contribution to appetite reduction has been reported. Objective: Because biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) does not affect appetite, we compared ghrelin production and 24-h pulsatility between healthy control subjects and obese subjects before and after BPD. Design: A computerized algorithm identified peak heights, clearance rate, and peak frequency of ghrelin over 24 h. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was measured in the calorimetric chamber, and energy intakes were computed. Insulin sensitivity was measured with a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Results: Mean (±SD) 24-h plasma ghrelin concentrations were significantly (P <0.0001) higher in control than in obese subjects (338.17 ± 22.09 and 164.47 ± 29.19 μg/L, respectively), but they increased to 204.64 ± 28.51 μg/L in the obese subjects after BPD (P <0.01). The pulsatility index was 0.098 ± 0.016 and 0.041 ± 0.014 μg·L-1·min -1 in control and obese subjects, respectively (P <0.01), and decreased to 0.025 ± 0.007 μg·l-1·min -1 after BPD (P <0.05). Energy intakes before and after BFP did not differ significantly. Although metabolizable energy after BPD was 40% of the energy intake, that (per kg fat-free mass) after BPD did not different significantly from that before BPD. Conclusions: Weight loss induced by malabsorptive bariatric surgery is associated with greater ghrelin concentrations, which, however, remain consistently lower than those in control subjects, whereas ghrelin pulsatility is subverted. Higher ghrelin concentrationsmaycontribute to the high calorie intakes observed in post-BPD subjects. The lack of normal pulsatility may explain the new impulse of these subjects to eat very frequently.

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KW - Morbid obesity

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