Ultrasonic nebulization of hypertonic solution: A new method for obtaining specimens from nasal mucosa for morphologic and biochemical analysis in allergic rhinitis

G. Melillo, G. Balzano, F. Stefanelli, C. Iorio, E. De Angelis, E. Melillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Various techniques are used to collect specimens from the nasal mucosa for morphologic and biochemical analysis. The purpose of this study was to devise a method that overcomes some of the disadvantages (e.g., invasive procedure, samples not suitable for cytologic and biochemical analysis, lack of standardization, and poor reproducibility) of these techniques. The new method requires subjects, with neck extended, to inhale an ultrasonic nebulization of a hypertonic (3% NaCl) solution (UNHS) for 5 min. They then blow their nose into a Petri dish, one nostril at a time with the other one blocked. The secretions are dispersed with 0.1% dithiothreitol in phosphate buffer solution for 20 min. Total cell count (TCC) is evaluated, and the cellular suspension is divided into two aliquots: one is centrifuged and the supernatants are collected for eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) measurements; the other is cytocentrifuged and the slides, stained with Diff- Quik, are used for differential cell count. The results obtained with the UNHS and nasal lavage (NL) methods were compared. Eleven nonatopic healthy subjects and 19 allergic rhinitic patients were studied. Total cell count (x105) was significantly higher with UNHS than with NL (13.0±12.3 vs 1.9±1.6; P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)794-797
Number of pages4
JournalAllergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume53
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Eosinophil cationic protein
  • Hypertonic saline solution
  • Nasal lavage
  • Ultrasonic nebulization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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