Ultrasound biomicroscopy in small animal research: Applications in molecular and preclinical imaging

A. Greco, M. Mancini, S. Gargiulo, M. Gramanzini, P. P. Claudio, A. Brunetti, M. Salvatore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is a noninvasive multimodality technique that allows high-resolution imaging in mice. It is affordable, widely available, and portable. When it is coupled to Doppler ultrasound with color and power Doppler, it can be used to quantify blood flow and to image microcirculation as well as the response of tumor blood supply to cancer therapy. Target contrast ultrasound combines ultrasound with novel molecular targeted contrast agent to assess biological processes at molecular level. UBM is useful to investigate the growth and differentiation of tumors as well as to detect early molecular expression of cancer-related biomarkers in vivo and to monitor the effects of cancer therapies. It can be also used to visualize the embryological development of mice in uterus or to examine their cardiovascular development. The availability of real-time imaging of mice anatomy allows performing aspiration procedures under ultrasound guidance as well as the microinjection of cells, viruses, or other agents into precise locations. This paper will describe some basic principles of high-resolution imaging equipment, and the most important applications in molecular and preclinical imaging in small animal research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number519238
JournalJournal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Medicine(all)

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