Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach in the Languedoc-Roussillon area

D. Caimmi, D. Barber, K. Hoffmann-Sommergruber, H. Amrane, P. J. Bousquet, H. Dhivert-Donnadieu, P. Demoly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Cypress allergy is a typical winter pollinosis and the most frequent one in the South of France. Main symptoms are rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthma. Peach allergy is common too in Southern Europe. Allergic cross-reactions between cypress and peach have been reported, including an oral allergy syndrome. We wanted to investigate whether a cross-reactive allergen between cypress and peach might be responsible for the observed clinical association. Methods We analyzed 127 patients included over a 3-month period, outside the pollen season, and we dosed specific IgE levels, for selected, individual allergens. Results Patients sensitized to peach were mainly positive for the peach-nonspecific lipid-transfer protein. Conclusions Profilins or thaumatins could not explain the observed clinical association between cypress and peach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-251
Number of pages3
JournalAllergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume68
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Cupressus
Pollen
Hypersensitivity
Allergens
Profilins
Conjunctivitis
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Cross Reactions
Rhinitis
Immunoglobulin E
France
Prunus persica
Asthma

Keywords

  • allergen-specific sensitization
  • allergens
  • cypress pollen
  • peach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Caimmi, D., Barber, D., Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K., Amrane, H., Bousquet, P. J., Dhivert-Donnadieu, H., & Demoly, P. (2013). Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach in the Languedoc-Roussillon area. Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 68(2), 249-251. https://doi.org/10.1111/all.12073

Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach in the Languedoc-Roussillon area. / Caimmi, D.; Barber, D.; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K.; Amrane, H.; Bousquet, P. J.; Dhivert-Donnadieu, H.; Demoly, P.

In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 68, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 249-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caimmi, D, Barber, D, Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K, Amrane, H, Bousquet, PJ, Dhivert-Donnadieu, H & Demoly, P 2013, 'Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach in the Languedoc-Roussillon area', Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 68, no. 2, pp. 249-251. https://doi.org/10.1111/all.12073
Caimmi, D. ; Barber, D. ; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K. ; Amrane, H. ; Bousquet, P. J. ; Dhivert-Donnadieu, H. ; Demoly, P. / Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach in the Languedoc-Roussillon area. In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2013 ; Vol. 68, No. 2. pp. 249-251.
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