University patenting: Patterns of faculty motivations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few papers address the issue of faculty motivations to patent and none comprehensively investigates why faculties decide not to patent. To fill this gap, I surveyed Italian faculty inventors of university-owned patents (N = 208) and non-inventors working in the same disciplines (N = 416). Major motivations to patent are prestige/reputation and knowledge exchange. Although universities rely almost exclusively on royalties, I show that researchers are sensitive to diverse incentives, whose importance varies according to both personal characteristics and the context. Surprisingly, patents are not perceived by non-inventors as inappropriate to academic activities or as obstacles to publications and conferences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-121
Number of pages19
JournalTechnology Analysis and Strategic Management
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

Fingerprint

University patenting
Patents
Prestige
Incentives
Royalty
Personal characteristics
Knowledge exchange
Inventor

Keywords

  • Incentive
  • Motivation
  • Open science
  • Royalty
  • University patent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

University patenting : Patterns of faculty motivations. / Baldini, Nicola.

In: Technology Analysis and Strategic Management, Vol. 23, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 103-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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